Smallest viable office size?

Curious if any of you have pushed the limit of how small a micro-office could be? There are so many people who are just always on the phone or meeting clients for coaching or whatnot and can’t work in the open area but are dying for the coworking community.

What is your smallest office size?

Angel

48sf: 6x8

Jerome

···

Www.BLANKSPACES.com

On Jan 12, 2018, at 12:36 PM, Angel Kwiatkowski [email protected] wrote:

Curious if any of you have pushed the limit of how small a micro-office could be? There are so many people who are just always on the phone or meeting clients for coaching or whatnot and can’t work in the open area but are dying for the coworking community.

What is your smallest office size?

Angel

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···

On Fri, Jan 12, 2018 at 4:14 PM, Jerome Chang [email protected] wrote:

48sf: 6x8

Jerome

Www.BLANKSPACES.com

On Jan 12, 2018, at 12:36 PM, Angel Kwiatkowski [email protected] wrote:

Curious if any of you have pushed the limit of how small a micro-office could be? There are so many people who are just always on the phone or meeting clients for coaching or whatnot and can’t work in the open area but are dying for the coworking community.

What is your smallest office size?

Angel

You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

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The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.

Better Coworkers: http://indyhall.org

Weekly Coworking Tips: http://coworkingweekly.com

My Audiobook: https://theindyhallway.com/ten

It really depends on what you mean by “office”

If you mean the size of a room which one person is going to sit by themselves for the whole day working on projects, it would be different that the size of a room for someone to make a private call or to have a one on one meeting.

The phone booth size can be smaller than the 6*8 that people are listing as an office size.

I was just at WeWork, they have little indents in the walls alone some of the hall ways. These must be 2.5 ft by 5 feet. But they are not closed off. these are like a crammed dinner seat for two people facing each other over a table.

They also have one person phone booths, which are likely 3 x 3 - Enough for a bench and a shelf.

These are closed with ventilation.

I know another coworking space that I have a client at, where the room is not much bigger than 4x8.

But that is an exception. There is likely reasons to have an office space be nicer like 6x8 or a bit better.

···

On Fri, Jan 12, 2018 at 12:36 PM, Angel Kwiatkowski [email protected] wrote:

Curious if any of you have pushed the limit of how small a micro-office could be? There are so many people who are just always on the phone or meeting clients for coaching or whatnot and can’t work in the open area but are dying for the coworking community.

What is your smallest office size?

Angel

You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

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John Sechrest . Need to schedule a meeting : http://sechrest.youcanbookme.com
.
.
.
. [email protected]com
. @sechrest
.
http://www.oomaat.com .

Haha.

It’s almost a coincidence, and it almost isn’t. I called out the Exec suites offices as “office prisons” in my original business plan from 2006-2007.

Jerome

···

On Jan 12, 2018, at 1:17 PM, Alex Hillman [email protected] wrote:


The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.

Better Coworkers: http://indyhall.org

Weekly Coworking Tips: http://coworkingweekly.com

My Audiobook: https://theindyhallway.com/ten

On Fri, Jan 12, 2018 at 4:14 PM, Jerome Chang [email protected] wrote:

48sf: 6x8

Jerome

Www.BLANKSPACES.com

On Jan 12, 2018, at 12:36 PM, Angel Kwiatkowski [email protected] wrote:

Curious if any of you have pushed the limit of how small a micro-office could be? There are so many people who are just always on the phone or meeting clients for coaching or whatnot and can’t work in the open area but are dying for the coworking community.

What is your smallest office size?

Angel

You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

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···

I very much understand the problem, but the solution of “make the office smaller” always feels short sighted to me.

My best answer to folks whose work isn’t coworking compatible looks like this:

*"Do you have one (or two or three) days a month worth of work that **isn’t that? ***

Time you spend doing paperwork. Or research. Or strategic planning. Or book keeping. Or…

*I bet you do that stuff scattered throughout your month. It gets shoved into corners and only done at the last minute. *

What if you picked one (or two or three) days a month to come to the coworking space, be around other people, and get that other work that doesn’t require you to be behind closed doors, done? I bet you’d get it done faster, and when you take a break or finish you’d have people to talk to!

If you have to grab a call or whatever while you’re here, there’s a spot for that. But it works even better if you defend that productive time and use it to make you or your business better in some way."

Everybody wins.

On Fri, Jan 12, 2018 at 4:38 PM, John Sechrest <sech…@gmail.com> wrote:

It really depends on what you mean by “office”

If you mean the size of a room which one person is going to sit by themselves for the whole day working on projects, it would be different that the size of a room for someone to make a private call or to have a one on one meeting.

The phone booth size can be smaller than the 6*8 that people are listing as an office size.

I was just at WeWork, they have little indents in the walls alone some of the hall ways. These must be 2.5 ft by 5 feet. But they are not closed off. these are like a crammed dinner seat for two people facing each other over a table.

They also have one person phone booths, which are likely 3 x 3 - Enough for a bench and a shelf.

These are closed with ventilation.

I know another coworking space that I have a client at, where the room is not much bigger than 4x8.

But that is an exception. There is likely reasons to have an office space be nicer like 6x8 or a bit better.

You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to [email protected].

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.


The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.

Better Coworkers: http://indyhall.org

Weekly Coworking Tips: http://coworkingweekly.com

My Audiobook: https://theindyhallway.com/ten

On Fri, Jan 12, 2018 at 12:36 PM, Angel Kwiatkowski <fccow…@gmail.com> wrote:

Curious if any of you have pushed the limit of how small a micro-office could be? There are so many people who are just always on the phone or meeting clients for coaching or whatnot and can’t work in the open area but are dying for the coworking community.

What is your smallest office size?

Angel

You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to [email protected].

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

http://www.oomaat.com .

John Sechrest . Need to schedule a meeting : http://sechrest.youcanbookme.com
.
.
.
. sech…@gmail.com
. @sechrest
.

The strategy of making the office smaller is to offer a workspace that both offers an affordable price point, and a level of privacy/ergonomics that that member simply needs to be productive.

Yes, one way is indeed like Alex says, which is to only come in to a Coworking space for certain types of work, but another way is to provide a physical space that actually does provide a space that one could be productive everyday.

Jerome

···

On Jan 12, 2018, at 2:04 PM, Alex Hillman [email protected] wrote:

I very much understand the problem, but the solution of “make the office smaller” always feels short sighted to me.

My best answer to folks whose work isn’t coworking compatible looks like this:

*"Do you have one (or two or three) days a month worth of work that **isn’t that? ***

Time you spend doing paperwork. Or research. Or strategic planning. Or book keeping. Or…

*I bet you do that stuff scattered throughout your month. It gets shoved into corners and only done at the last minute. *

What if you picked one (or two or three) days a month to come to the coworking space, be around other people, and get that other work that doesn’t require you to be behind closed doors, done? I bet you’d get it done faster, and when you take a break or finish you’d have people to talk to!

If you have to grab a call or whatever while you’re here, there’s a spot for that. But it works even better if you defend that productive time and use it to make you or your business better in some way."

Everybody wins.


The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.

Better Coworkers: http://indyhall.org

Weekly Coworking Tips: http://coworkingweekly.com

My Audiobook: https://theindyhallway.com/ten

On Fri, Jan 12, 2018 at 4:38 PM, John Sechrest <sech…@gmail.com> wrote:

It really depends on what you mean by “office”

If you mean the size of a room which one person is going to sit by themselves for the whole day working on projects, it would be different that the size of a room for someone to make a private call or to have a one on one meeting.

The phone booth size can be smaller than the 6*8 that people are listing as an office size.

I was just at WeWork, they have little indents in the walls alone some of the hall ways. These must be 2.5 ft by 5 feet. But they are not closed off. these are like a crammed dinner seat for two people facing each other over a table.

They also have one person phone booths, which are likely 3 x 3 - Enough for a bench and a shelf.

These are closed with ventilation.

I know another coworking space that I have a client at, where the room is not much bigger than 4x8.

But that is an exception. There is likely reasons to have an office space be nicer like 6x8 or a bit better.

On Fri, Jan 12, 2018 at 12:36 PM, Angel Kwiatkowski <fccow…@gmail.com> wrote:

Curious if any of you have pushed the limit of how small a micro-office could be? There are so many people who are just always on the phone or meeting clients for coaching or whatnot and can’t work in the open area but are dying for the coworking community.

What is your smallest office size?

Angel

You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to [email protected].

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

http://www.oomaat.com .

John Sechrest . Need to schedule a meeting : http://sechrest.youcanbookme.com
.
.
.
. sech…@gmail.com
. @sechrest
.

You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

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We have a bunch of 6x8 phone rooms. They’re very comfortable. I’m so glad we have them.

They’re well ventilated, ergonomically designed, and are NOT productive spaces for every day use.

That’s the thing. It’s not hard to give somebody something they need. But is it actually better? Or even in their best interest?

I don’t buy it. I think we can come up with a truly better solution. The bar is so low when we’re talking about one that’s literally the equivalent to a prison cell.

···

On Fri, Jan 12, 2018 at 6:06 PM, Jerome Chang [email protected] wrote:

The strategy of making the office smaller is to offer a workspace that both offers an affordable price point, and a level of privacy/ergonomics that that member simply needs to be productive.

Jerome

Yes, one way is indeed like Alex says, which is to only come in to a Coworking space for certain types of work, but another way is to provide a physical space that actually does provide a space that one could be productive everyday.

On Jan 12, 2018, at 2:04 PM, Alex Hillman [email protected] wrote:

You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

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For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

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The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.

Better Coworkers: http://indyhall.org

Weekly Coworking Tips: http://coworkingweekly.com

My Audiobook: https://theindyhallway.com/ten

I very much understand the problem, but the solution of “make the office smaller” always feels short sighted to me.

My best answer to folks whose work isn’t coworking compatible looks like this:

*"Do you have one (or two or three) days a month worth of work that **isn’t that? ***

Time you spend doing paperwork. Or research. Or strategic planning. Or book keeping. Or…

*I bet you do that stuff scattered throughout your month. It gets shoved into corners and only done at the last minute. *

What if you picked one (or two or three) days a month to come to the coworking space, be around other people, and get that other work that doesn’t require you to be behind closed doors, done? I bet you’d get it done faster, and when you take a break or finish you’d have people to talk to!

If you have to grab a call or whatever while you’re here, there’s a spot for that. But it works even better if you defend that productive time and use it to make you or your business better in some way."

Everybody wins.


The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.

Better Coworkers: http://indyhall.org

Weekly Coworking Tips: http://coworkingweekly.com

My Audiobook: https://theindyhallway.com/ten

On Fri, Jan 12, 2018 at 4:38 PM, John Sechrest <sech…@gmail.com> wrote:

It really depends on what you mean by “office”

If you mean the size of a room which one person is going to sit by themselves for the whole day working on projects, it would be different that the size of a room for someone to make a private call or to have a one on one meeting.

The phone booth size can be smaller than the 6*8 that people are listing as an office size.

I was just at WeWork, they have little indents in the walls alone some of the hall ways. These must be 2.5 ft by 5 feet. But they are not closed off. these are like a crammed dinner seat for two people facing each other over a table.

They also have one person phone booths, which are likely 3 x 3 - Enough for a bench and a shelf.

These are closed with ventilation.

I know another coworking space that I have a client at, where the room is not much bigger than 4x8.

But that is an exception. There is likely reasons to have an office space be nicer like 6x8 or a bit better.

You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to [email protected].

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

On Fri, Jan 12, 2018 at 12:36 PM, Angel Kwiatkowski <fccow…@gmail.com> wrote:

Curious if any of you have pushed the limit of how small a micro-office could be? There are so many people who are just always on the phone or meeting clients for coaching or whatnot and can’t work in the open area but are dying for the coworking community.

What is your smallest office size?

Angel

You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to [email protected].

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

http://www.oomaat.com .

John Sechrest . Need to schedule a meeting : http://sechrest.youcanbookme.com
.
.
.
. sech…@gmail.com
. @sechrest
.

I’ve personally worked in our 6x8 offices, and so have legions of others for months at a time. They’ve seemed pretty happy, as I have, too. I think plenty of people work differently enough, that no one solution fits.

That said, Alex, what is it that you’re trying to solve that you think the bar is so low? Maybe I’ve missed your main point

Jerome

www.BLANKSPACES.com

···

On Jan 12, 2018, at 3:17 PM, Alex Hillman [email protected] wrote:

We have a bunch of 6x8 phone rooms. They’re very comfortable. I’m so glad we have them.

They’re well ventilated, ergonomically designed, and are NOT productive spaces for every day use.

That’s the thing. It’s not hard to give somebody something they need. But is it actually better? Or even in their best interest?

I don’t buy it. I think we can come up with a truly better solution. The bar is so low when we’re talking about one that’s literally the equivalent to a prison cell.


The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.

Better Coworkers: http://indyhall.org

Weekly Coworking Tips: http://coworkingweekly.com

My Audiobook: https://theindyhallway.com/ten

On Fri, Jan 12, 2018 at 6:06 PM, Jerome Chang [email protected] wrote:

The strategy of making the office smaller is to offer a workspace that both offers an affordable price point, and a level of privacy/ergonomics that that member simply needs to be productive.

Jerome

Yes, one way is indeed like Alex says, which is to only come in to a Coworking space for certain types of work, but another way is to provide a physical space that actually does provide a space that one could be productive everyday.

On Jan 12, 2018, at 2:04 PM, Alex Hillman [email protected] wrote:

I very much understand the problem, but the solution of “make the office smaller” always feels short sighted to me.

My best answer to folks whose work isn’t coworking compatible looks like this:

*"Do you have one (or two or three) days a month worth of work that **isn’t that? ***

Time you spend doing paperwork. Or research. Or strategic planning. Or book keeping. Or…

*I bet you do that stuff scattered throughout your month. It gets shoved into corners and only done at the last minute. *

What if you picked one (or two or three) days a month to come to the coworking space, be around other people, and get that other work that doesn’t require you to be behind closed doors, done? I bet you’d get it done faster, and when you take a break or finish you’d have people to talk to!

If you have to grab a call or whatever while you’re here, there’s a spot for that. But it works even better if you defend that productive time and use it to make you or your business better in some way."

Everybody wins.


The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.

Better Coworkers: http://indyhall.org

Weekly Coworking Tips: http://coworkingweekly.com

My Audiobook: https://theindyhallway.com/ten

On Fri, Jan 12, 2018 at 4:38 PM, John Sechrest <sech…@gmail.com> wrote:

It really depends on what you mean by “office”

If you mean the size of a room which one person is going to sit by themselves for the whole day working on projects, it would be different that the size of a room for someone to make a private call or to have a one on one meeting.

The phone booth size can be smaller than the 6*8 that people are listing as an office size.

I was just at WeWork, they have little indents in the walls alone some of the hall ways. These must be 2.5 ft by 5 feet. But they are not closed off. these are like a crammed dinner seat for two people facing each other over a table.

They also have one person phone booths, which are likely 3 x 3 - Enough for a bench and a shelf.

These are closed with ventilation.

I know another coworking space that I have a client at, where the room is not much bigger than 4x8.

But that is an exception. There is likely reasons to have an office space be nicer like 6x8 or a bit better.

On Fri, Jan 12, 2018 at 12:36 PM, Angel Kwiatkowski <fccow…@gmail.com> wrote:

Curious if any of you have pushed the limit of how small a micro-office could be? There are so many people who are just always on the phone or meeting clients for coaching or whatnot and can’t work in the open area but are dying for the coworking community.

What is your smallest office size?

Angel

You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to [email protected].

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

http://www.oomaat.com .

John Sechrest . Need to schedule a meeting : http://sechrest.youcanbookme.com
.
.
.
. sech…@gmail.com
. @sechrest
.

You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

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“There are so many people who are just always on the phone or meeting clients for coaching or whatnot and can’t work in the open area but are dying for the coworking community.”

This is a real problem, and one I think we’re all interested in solving. I just want to encourage thinking outside of the 6x8 box.

And there’s tons of brainpower on this list. So let’s do an experiment.

Imagine a 6x8’ room was not an option. What other ways could we help this kind of person’s needs?

···

On Fri, Jan 12, 2018 at 6:30 PM, Jerome Chang [email protected] wrote:

I’ve personally worked in our 6x8 offices, and so have legions of others for months at a time. They’ve seemed pretty happy, as I have, too. I think plenty of people work differently enough, that no one solution fits.

That said, Alex, what is it that you’re trying to solve that you think the bar is so low? Maybe I’ve missed your main point

Jerome

www.BLANKSPACES.com

On Jan 12, 2018, at 3:17 PM, Alex Hillman [email protected] wrote:

We have a bunch of 6x8 phone rooms. They’re very comfortable. I’m so glad we have them.

They’re well ventilated, ergonomically designed, and are NOT productive spaces for every day use.

That’s the thing. It’s not hard to give somebody something they need. But is it actually better? Or even in their best interest?

I don’t buy it. I think we can come up with a truly better solution. The bar is so low when we’re talking about one that’s literally the equivalent to a prison cell.

You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to [email protected].

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

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For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.


The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.

Better Coworkers: http://indyhall.org

Weekly Coworking Tips: http://coworkingweekly.com

My Audiobook: https://theindyhallway.com/ten


The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.

Better Coworkers: http://indyhall.org

Weekly Coworking Tips: http://coworkingweekly.com

My Audiobook: https://theindyhallway.com/ten

On Fri, Jan 12, 2018 at 6:06 PM, Jerome Chang [email protected] wrote:

The strategy of making the office smaller is to offer a workspace that both offers an affordable price point, and a level of privacy/ergonomics that that member simply needs to be productive.

Jerome

Yes, one way is indeed like Alex says, which is to only come in to a Coworking space for certain types of work, but another way is to provide a physical space that actually does provide a space that one could be productive everyday.

On Jan 12, 2018, at 2:04 PM, Alex Hillman [email protected] wrote:

You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to [email protected].

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

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I very much understand the problem, but the solution of “make the office smaller” always feels short sighted to me.

My best answer to folks whose work isn’t coworking compatible looks like this:

*"Do you have one (or two or three) days a month worth of work that **isn’t that? ***

Time you spend doing paperwork. Or research. Or strategic planning. Or book keeping. Or…

*I bet you do that stuff scattered throughout your month. It gets shoved into corners and only done at the last minute. *

What if you picked one (or two or three) days a month to come to the coworking space, be around other people, and get that other work that doesn’t require you to be behind closed doors, done? I bet you’d get it done faster, and when you take a break or finish you’d have people to talk to!

If you have to grab a call or whatever while you’re here, there’s a spot for that. But it works even better if you defend that productive time and use it to make you or your business better in some way."

Everybody wins.


The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.

Better Coworkers: http://indyhall.org

Weekly Coworking Tips: http://coworkingweekly.com

My Audiobook: https://theindyhallway.com/ten

On Fri, Jan 12, 2018 at 4:38 PM, John Sechrest <sech…@gmail.com> wrote:

It really depends on what you mean by “office”

If you mean the size of a room which one person is going to sit by themselves for the whole day working on projects, it would be different that the size of a room for someone to make a private call or to have a one on one meeting.

The phone booth size can be smaller than the 6*8 that people are listing as an office size.

I was just at WeWork, they have little indents in the walls alone some of the hall ways. These must be 2.5 ft by 5 feet. But they are not closed off. these are like a crammed dinner seat for two people facing each other over a table.

They also have one person phone booths, which are likely 3 x 3 - Enough for a bench and a shelf.

These are closed with ventilation.

I know another coworking space that I have a client at, where the room is not much bigger than 4x8.

But that is an exception. There is likely reasons to have an office space be nicer like 6x8 or a bit better.

You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to [email protected].

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

On Fri, Jan 12, 2018 at 12:36 PM, Angel Kwiatkowski <fccow…@gmail.com> wrote:

Curious if any of you have pushed the limit of how small a micro-office could be? There are so many people who are just always on the phone or meeting clients for coaching or whatnot and can’t work in the open area but are dying for the coworking community.

What is your smallest office size?

Angel

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John Sechrest . Need to schedule a meeting : http://sechrest.youcanbookme.com
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Just to be explicit…

When you say:

Imagine a 6x8’ room was not an option. What other ways could we help this kind of person’s needs?

The needs that you are identifying:

1 - Phone privacy - so people don’t hear the content of the call

2 - Phone disruption - so others don’t get bother by phone calls/phones ringing

3 - space for 2 people to meet and have a private conversation

4 - want to engage with other people ( needs to be visible to the community )

5 - Doesn’t get interupted when Busy

6 - has healthy air flow

7 - can leave desk and computers set up and don’t have to move things.

Does the Client privacy go so far as to require people can not see who you are meeting with?

···

On Fri, Jan 12, 2018 at 3:34 PM, Alex Hillman [email protected] wrote:

“There are so many people who are just always on the phone or meeting clients for coaching or whatnot and can’t work in the open area but are dying for the coworking community.”

This is a real problem, and one I think we’re all interested in solving. I just want to encourage thinking outside of the 6x8 box.

And there’s tons of brainpower on this list. So let’s do an experiment.

Imagine a 6x8’ room was not an option. What other ways could we help this kind of person’s needs?

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The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.

Better Coworkers: http://indyhall.org

Weekly Coworking Tips: http://coworkingweekly.com

My Audiobook: https://theindyhallway.com/ten

On Fri, Jan 12, 2018 at 6:30 PM, Jerome Chang [email protected] wrote:

I’ve personally worked in our 6x8 offices, and so have legions of others for months at a time. They’ve seemed pretty happy, as I have, too. I think plenty of people work differently enough, that no one solution fits.

That said, Alex, what is it that you’re trying to solve that you think the bar is so low? Maybe I’ve missed your main point

Jerome

www.BLANKSPACES.com

On Jan 12, 2018, at 3:17 PM, Alex Hillman [email protected] wrote:

We have a bunch of 6x8 phone rooms. They’re very comfortable. I’m so glad we have them.

They’re well ventilated, ergonomically designed, and are NOT productive spaces for every day use.

That’s the thing. It’s not hard to give somebody something they need. But is it actually better? Or even in their best interest?

I don’t buy it. I think we can come up with a truly better solution. The bar is so low when we’re talking about one that’s literally the equivalent to a prison cell.

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The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.

Better Coworkers: http://indyhall.org

Weekly Coworking Tips: http://coworkingweekly.com

My Audiobook: https://theindyhallway.com/ten

On Fri, Jan 12, 2018 at 6:06 PM, Jerome Chang [email protected] wrote:

The strategy of making the office smaller is to offer a workspace that both offers an affordable price point, and a level of privacy/ergonomics that that member simply needs to be productive.

Jerome

Yes, one way is indeed like Alex says, which is to only come in to a Coworking space for certain types of work, but another way is to provide a physical space that actually does provide a space that one could be productive everyday.

On Jan 12, 2018, at 2:04 PM, Alex Hillman [email protected] wrote:

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I very much understand the problem, but the solution of “make the office smaller” always feels short sighted to me.

My best answer to folks whose work isn’t coworking compatible looks like this:

*"Do you have one (or two or three) days a month worth of work that **isn’t that? ***

Time you spend doing paperwork. Or research. Or strategic planning. Or book keeping. Or…

*I bet you do that stuff scattered throughout your month. It gets shoved into corners and only done at the last minute. *

What if you picked one (or two or three) days a month to come to the coworking space, be around other people, and get that other work that doesn’t require you to be behind closed doors, done? I bet you’d get it done faster, and when you take a break or finish you’d have people to talk to!

If you have to grab a call or whatever while you’re here, there’s a spot for that. But it works even better if you defend that productive time and use it to make you or your business better in some way."

Everybody wins.


The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.

Better Coworkers: http://indyhall.org

Weekly Coworking Tips: http://coworkingweekly.com

My Audiobook: https://theindyhallway.com/ten

On Fri, Jan 12, 2018 at 4:38 PM, John Sechrest <sech…@gmail.com> wrote:

It really depends on what you mean by “office”

If you mean the size of a room which one person is going to sit by themselves for the whole day working on projects, it would be different that the size of a room for someone to make a private call or to have a one on one meeting.

The phone booth size can be smaller than the 6*8 that people are listing as an office size.

I was just at WeWork, they have little indents in the walls alone some of the hall ways. These must be 2.5 ft by 5 feet. But they are not closed off. these are like a crammed dinner seat for two people facing each other over a table.

They also have one person phone booths, which are likely 3 x 3 - Enough for a bench and a shelf.

These are closed with ventilation.

I know another coworking space that I have a client at, where the room is not much bigger than 4x8.

But that is an exception. There is likely reasons to have an office space be nicer like 6x8 or a bit better.

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On Fri, Jan 12, 2018 at 12:36 PM, Angel Kwiatkowski <fccow…@gmail.com> wrote:

Curious if any of you have pushed the limit of how small a micro-office could be? There are so many people who are just always on the phone or meeting clients for coaching or whatnot and can’t work in the open area but are dying for the coworking community.

What is your smallest office size?

Angel

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http://www.oomaat.com .

John Sechrest . Need to schedule a meeting : http://sechrest.youcanbookme.com
.
.
.
. sech…@gmail.com
. @sechrest
.

John Sechrest . Need to schedule a meeting : http://sechrest.youcanbookme.com
.
.
.
. [email protected]
. @sechrest
.
http://www.oomaat.com .

Right. Forgot that.

For those users, that 6x8 office isn’t a fit. They’ll spend more than they need as well.

We offer free half hour meeting room usage, when unreserved, for cafe/lounge/hot desk users. This might only be good for the occasional phone user.

Heavier phone usage would either have to be ok w/ calls in the open area (assuming their calls aren’t loud and would contribute to the overall buzz/white noise of the space). If these heavy phone usage are louder or require more privacy for client sensitivity, then an enclosed office makes a lot of sense. And then, if budget conscious, then 6x8.

However, this does not mean this office member would be relegated to their office. We encourage any office member to work in any other lounge/cafe/shared areas to simply mix it up, interact with others, etc.

At some point, the member has to both want to interact with a community and be willing to interact. Laziness, shyness, etc. can all set in though.

One could aggregate all their calls on certain days, and remain at home.

Or the opposite,

Only come in on the days they’ve carved out as non-phone days.

Jerome

Www.BLANKSPACES.com

···

On Jan 12, 2018, at 3:34 PM, Alex Hillman [email protected] wrote:

“There are so many people who are just always on the phone or meeting clients for coaching or whatnot and can’t work in the open area but are dying for the coworking community.”

This is a real problem, and one I think we’re all interested in solving. I just want to encourage thinking outside of the 6x8 box.

And there’s tons of brainpower on this list. So let’s do an experiment.

Imagine a 6x8’ room was not an option. What other ways could we help this kind of person’s needs?


The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.

Better Coworkers: http://indyhall.org

Weekly Coworking Tips: http://coworkingweekly.com

My Audiobook: https://theindyhallway.com/ten

On Fri, Jan 12, 2018 at 6:30 PM, Jerome Chang [email protected] wrote:

I’ve personally worked in our 6x8 offices, and so have legions of others for months at a time. They’ve seemed pretty happy, as I have, too. I think plenty of people work differently enough, that no one solution fits.

That said, Alex, what is it that you’re trying to solve that you think the bar is so low? Maybe I’ve missed your main point

Jerome

www.BLANKSPACES.com

On Jan 12, 2018, at 3:17 PM, Alex Hillman [email protected] wrote:

We have a bunch of 6x8 phone rooms. They’re very comfortable. I’m so glad we have them.

They’re well ventilated, ergonomically designed, and are NOT productive spaces for every day use.

That’s the thing. It’s not hard to give somebody something they need. But is it actually better? Or even in their best interest?

I don’t buy it. I think we can come up with a truly better solution. The bar is so low when we’re talking about one that’s literally the equivalent to a prison cell.


The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.

Better Coworkers: http://indyhall.org

Weekly Coworking Tips: http://coworkingweekly.com

My Audiobook: https://theindyhallway.com/ten

On Fri, Jan 12, 2018 at 6:06 PM, Jerome Chang [email protected] wrote:

The strategy of making the office smaller is to offer a workspace that both offers an affordable price point, and a level of privacy/ergonomics that that member simply needs to be productive.

Jerome

Yes, one way is indeed like Alex says, which is to only come in to a Coworking space for certain types of work, but another way is to provide a physical space that actually does provide a space that one could be productive everyday.

On Jan 12, 2018, at 2:04 PM, Alex Hillman [email protected] wrote:

I very much understand the problem, but the solution of “make the office smaller” always feels short sighted to me.

My best answer to folks whose work isn’t coworking compatible looks like this:

*"Do you have one (or two or three) days a month worth of work that **isn’t that? ***

Time you spend doing paperwork. Or research. Or strategic planning. Or book keeping. Or…

*I bet you do that stuff scattered throughout your month. It gets shoved into corners and only done at the last minute. *

What if you picked one (or two or three) days a month to come to the coworking space, be around other people, and get that other work that doesn’t require you to be behind closed doors, done? I bet you’d get it done faster, and when you take a break or finish you’d have people to talk to!

If you have to grab a call or whatever while you’re here, there’s a spot for that. But it works even better if you defend that productive time and use it to make you or your business better in some way."

Everybody wins.


The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.

Better Coworkers: http://indyhall.org

Weekly Coworking Tips: http://coworkingweekly.com

My Audiobook: https://theindyhallway.com/ten

On Fri, Jan 12, 2018 at 4:38 PM, John Sechrest <sech…@gmail.com> wrote:

It really depends on what you mean by “office”

If you mean the size of a room which one person is going to sit by themselves for the whole day working on projects, it would be different that the size of a room for someone to make a private call or to have a one on one meeting.

The phone booth size can be smaller than the 6*8 that people are listing as an office size.

I was just at WeWork, they have little indents in the walls alone some of the hall ways. These must be 2.5 ft by 5 feet. But they are not closed off. these are like a crammed dinner seat for two people facing each other over a table.

They also have one person phone booths, which are likely 3 x 3 - Enough for a bench and a shelf.

These are closed with ventilation.

I know another coworking space that I have a client at, where the room is not much bigger than 4x8.

But that is an exception. There is likely reasons to have an office space be nicer like 6x8 or a bit better.

On Fri, Jan 12, 2018 at 12:36 PM, Angel Kwiatkowski <fccow…@gmail.com> wrote:

Curious if any of you have pushed the limit of how small a micro-office could be? There are so many people who are just always on the phone or meeting clients for coaching or whatnot and can’t work in the open area but are dying for the coworking community.

What is your smallest office size?

Angel

You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to [email protected].

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

http://www.oomaat.com .

John Sechrest . Need to schedule a meeting : http://sechrest.youcanbookme.com
.
.
.
. sech…@gmail.com
. @sechrest
.

You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

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I have several thoughts:

  1. I enjoy posting questions that get people discussing

  2. What if we view work space as a thing that has as much importance as housing? Perhaps not for basic needs like a roof but for basic emotional needs of connection?

2a. by that logic, we can flip this script and apply Alex’s reasoning to housing. What if we remove the need for a permanent domicile and just provide a place where someone can group their sleep into 1-3 days/month and come to a house then to get that done? Maybe they only need a place to cook. Come use our shared kitchen for all your cooking needs! It doesn’t really make sense this way, does it? I’m sort of joking here but what if I’m not?

  1. There is a distinct difference in what YOUR house feels like vs. staying with a friend. Yes, you can still entertain at your friend’s house but it’s not an exact reflection of you as person. People are comforted by their own things in their own spaces.

3a. The same goes for office space. Some people very much desire to have their own corner of the work space where it is distinctly THEM. Whether that’s a business/brand or personal decision makes no difference.

3b. The nature of some business that happens in private offices CAN’T happen at home or in a 3rd workplace like a coffee shop. Take a counselor for instance. They see clients about half the time and work on the biz the other half. Their clients don’t want to walk through and in front of 100 people to get to their counselor. They want to come in, dive directly into the counselor’s office and do hard stuff. When they leave, they’d like to do so without walking with puffy eyes in front of everyone. And I don’t think we should expect health workers to meet people in their homes because then we destroy their personal sanctuary.

  1. Instead of requiring people to opt in to flex coworking, perhaps we need to ask ourselves how we invite them to be out of their offices whenever they aren’t meeting clients? This way, they get to have ONE work space instead of divvying up their work into separate locations.
···

On Friday, January 12, 2018 at 1:36:48 PM UTC-7, Angel Kwiatkowski wrote:

Curious if any of you have pushed the limit of how small a micro-office could be? There are so many people who are just always on the phone or meeting clients for coaching or whatnot and can’t work in the open area but are dying for the coworking community.

What is your smallest office size?

Angel

I agree. If we were to remove the mechanical needs of housing and only focus on the emotional attachments, then yes, coworking spaces could facilitate the connective tissues of community engagement.

I also agree that many and most people want to call a place their own, whether that be their nook, their desk, or 4 walls…within a larger community or neighborhood.

Not too different than a tight integration of hardware and software, physical space and community will intertwine as appropriate by both the manager/operator and the members themselves. Both will evolve, including one being more dominant than the other, then take turns later.

Jerome

···

On Jan 13, 2018, at 10:09 AM, Angel Kwiatkowski [email protected] wrote:

I have several thoughts:

  1. I enjoy posting questions that get people discussing
  1. What if we view work space as a thing that has as much importance as housing? Perhaps not for basic needs like a roof but for basic emotional needs of connection?

2a. by that logic, we can flip this script and apply Alex’s reasoning to housing. What if we remove the need for a permanent domicile and just provide a place where someone can group their sleep into 1-3 days/month and come to a house then to get that done? Maybe they only need a place to cook. Come use our shared kitchen for all your cooking needs! It doesn’t really make sense this way, does it? I’m sort of joking here but what if I’m not?

  1. There is a distinct difference in what YOUR house feels like vs. staying with a friend. Yes, you can still entertain at your friend’s house but it’s not an exact reflection of you as person. People are comforted by their own things in their own spaces.

3a. The same goes for office space. Some people very much desire to have their own corner of the work space where it is distinctly THEM. Whether that’s a business/brand or personal decision makes no difference.

3b. The nature of some business that happens in private offices CAN’T happen at home or in a 3rd workplace like a coffee shop. Take a counselor for instance. They see clients about half the time and work on the biz the other half. Their clients don’t want to walk through and in front of 100 people to get to their counselor. They want to come in, dive directly into the counselor’s office and do hard stuff. When they leave, they’d like to do so without walking with puffy eyes in front of everyone. And I don’t think we should expect health workers to meet people in their homes because then we destroy their personal sanctuary.

  1. Instead of requiring people to opt in to flex coworking, perhaps we need to ask ourselves how we invite them to be out of their offices whenever they aren’t meeting clients? This way, they get to have ONE work space instead of divvying up their work into separate locations.

On Friday, January 12, 2018 at 1:36:48 PM UTC-7, Angel Kwiatkowski wrote:

Curious if any of you have pushed the limit of how small a micro-office could be? There are so many people who are just always on the phone or meeting clients for coaching or whatnot and can’t work in the open area but are dying for the coworking community.

What is your smallest office size?

Angel

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