How would you improve coworking software?

Hi Everyone,

For those of you who manage coworking spaces, I’m wondering - what would you like to see to improve coworking apps and make them more useful to you and your members?

I’m familiar with apps like Cobot and Coworkify, among others.

I started a coworking space a few years ago and built an app that works as a CMS for the website, handles billing of members, and a public member directory, among a few other things. The app is now used by a number of spaces. I’m ready to refine it

Thanks!

Rob
[email protected]

There’s a million ways to manage billing out there but nothing that actually helps us be better at our jobs. I’d kill for tools that actually helped with the community building process.

Every CRM-like tool is basically a “deal flow” manager or, at best, an account manager. I’d love something that actually helped me and my team build and cultivate stronger relationships with the people in my community. Ideally, it’s something that members get value from too, and not just a “management” tool.

We’ve tried everything we can find and still get more mileage out of our convoluted Frankenstein of spreadsheets, Trello, Wordpress, and custom software. I would be thrilled to pay to outsource this to something designed with community in mind.

-Alex

···

On Thursday, April 7, 2016, Rob Landry [email protected] wrote:

Hi Everyone,

For those of you who manage coworking spaces, I’m wondering - what would you like to see to improve coworking apps and make them more useful to you and your members?

I’m familiar with apps like Cobot and Coworkify, among others.

I started a coworking space a few years ago and built an app that works as a CMS for the website, handles billing of members, and a public member directory, among a few other things. The app is now used by a number of spaces. I’m ready to refine it

Thanks!

Rob
[email protected]

Visit this forum on the web at http://discuss.coworking.com


You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

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The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.
Join the list: http://coworkingweekly.com
Listen to the podcast: http://dangerouslyawesome.com/podcast

Hello Alex,

This was one of the topics that came up at our bi-annual Cobot retreat too. We have always had the tagline “More Time for your Coworkers” - because we feel that the primary way to build community is getting out there face to face and building community. But over the years, we have the feeling too that it is time to be more active on adding the community building and personal matching tools right into Cobot (coming soon to a software near you).

But that being said, I think that there are also a lot of ways to built it within the space with events and the matchmaking that comes through with it. That is also one of the keys of co-up, our own space. We have been hosting meet-ups, especially programming oriented meetups and don’t charge room rent as long as they don’t collect fees from the attendees. For us it has been perfect because we are know throughout the community for being the host, and for being a space where people can run into each other. We know who to refer questions too and there is something for everyone (who programms). It becomes the identity of the space.

**But how can that be automated? **

You need to open the space, coordinate meetings, find willing coordinators. be available. Sure the scheduling can be automated, but that is a small piece of the pie…

Where does software come into the picture then…

We are putting our bet on “intelligent matching”. Increasing serendipity. Right now the referrals, are coming through our staff, but we want someone in the Rails Girls group to be able to meetup with someone from the Coding Amigos if they are both currently working on a front-end web project. And to encourage people to contact people who arrive on other nights.

Some of this is done through our Slack channel / integration. But a social platform that helps with matching is really the key.

No space manager, no matter how good they are can keep the individual quirks of 100+ members in their head, especially when people are coming for extra events as well!

Increasing the Building of Community is the Holy Grail of Coworking!

And it is what will always set independent spaces apart from the big “coworking” operations.

Maybe we can push it further at GCUC in LA!

···

On Saturday, April 9, 2016 at 6:35:04 PM UTC+2, Alex Hillman wrote:

There’s a million ways to manage billing out there but nothing that actually helps us be better at our jobs. I’d kill for tools that actually helped with the community building process.

Every CRM-like tool is basically a “deal flow” manager or, at best, an account manager. I’d love something that actually helped me and my team build and cultivate stronger relationships with the people in my community. Ideally, it’s something that members get value from too, and not just a “management” tool.

We’ve tried everything we can find and still get more mileage out of our convoluted Frankenstein of spreadsheets, Trello, Wordpress, and custom software. I would be thrilled to pay to outsource this to something designed with community in mind.

-Alex

On Thursday, April 7, 2016, Rob Landry [email protected] wrote:

Hi Everyone,

For those of you who manage coworking spaces, I’m wondering - what would you like to see to improve coworking apps and make them more useful to you and your members?

I’m familiar with apps like Cobot and Coworkify, among others.

I started a coworking space a few years ago and built an app that works as a CMS for the website, handles billing of members, and a public member directory, among a few other things. The app is now used by a number of spaces. I’m ready to refine it

Thanks!

Rob
[email protected]

Visit this forum on the web at http://discuss.coworking.com


You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to [email protected].

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.
Join the list: http://coworkingweekly.com
Listen to the podcast: http://dangerouslyawesome.com/podcast

I’m extremely skeptical of the leap to automation, especially when it’s paired with the idea of “matching.”

If relationships came down to a simple has/needs equation, maybe. But it’s much more nuanced than that. Dating sites have proven this for years. And I say this as someone who met his partner on a dating site.

There is an insane amount of low hanging fruit before we need anything that looks like automated matching.

Community Building isn’t a game of matching, it’s a game of trust building. The best way to build (and maintain!) trust at scale is to be looking for excuses for conversations, and keep track of what you learn over time. This helps individuals stay on top of things and teams “call the ball” before something happens, good or bad. It’s these conversations that help members feel felt, appreciated, heard, and understood.

  • “it’s been 2 weeks since Mary joined. Have you checked in with her to see how she’s doing?”

  • “if you checked in with Mary, reply with a couple of notes about your convo so the rest of your team knows how she’s doing too.”

  • “have you talked to any members this week who is having a tough time? Is there anything your team should know about that could make their lives easier, or conversation topics that might be worth avoiding?”

  • “next week is John’s three year anniversary anniversary of being a member. Let’s plan something special for him!”

  • “has anybody heard from George? It’s been 2 months since I saw any notes on his account. He might be looking to cancel soon if we lose touch.”

  • “these 25 people mentioned you on Twitter/Facebook/Instagram recently. Some might be members - remember to say thanks!”

  • “your event calendar is looking pretty empty next week. Maybe a good time to suggest a happy hour?”

Basically, I want a robot assistant that reminds me and my team to be an awesome human with our members and friends in the ecosystem. Light automation on top of data that a membership platform should have on hand.

We’ve barley started to cobble these kinds of reminders together along with our operational processes (http://dangerouslyawesome.com/2015/01/6-automated-workflows-that-make-our-coworking-space-better-every-day/) and it makes a HUGE difference for the team and their ability to support the community in ways that I know create MUCH more lasting, scalable value than a matching engine ever could hope to.

You’re right - it’s silly to expect that people keep this stuff in their head. But “matching” isn’t even on the list of tasks for our community team - that’s an outcome of doing the other stuff right.

-Alex

···

On Monday, April 11, 2016, Brian Crotty [email protected] wrote:

Hello Alex,

This was one of the topics that came up at our bi-annual Cobot retreat too. We have always had the tagline “More Time for your Coworkers” - because we feel that the primary way to build community is getting out there face to face and building community. But over the years, we have the feeling too that it is time to be more active on adding the community building and personal matching tools right into Cobot (coming soon to a software near you).

But that being said, I think that there are also a lot of ways to built it within the space with events and the matchmaking that comes through with it. That is also one of the keys of co-up, our own space. We have been hosting meet-ups, especially programming oriented meetups and don’t charge room rent as long as they don’t collect fees from the attendees. For us it has been perfect because we are know throughout the community for being the host, and for being a space where people can run into each other. We know who to refer questions too and there is something for everyone (who programms). It becomes the identity of the space.

**But how can that be automated? **

You need to open the space, coordinate meetings, find willing coordinators. be available. Sure the scheduling can be automated, but that is a small piece of the pie…

Where does software come into the picture then…

We are putting our bet on “intelligent matching”. Increasing serendipity. Right now the referrals, are coming through our staff, but we want someone in the Rails Girls group to be able to meetup with someone from the Coding Amigos if they are both currently working on a front-end web project. And to encourage people to contact people who arrive on other nights.

Some of this is done through our Slack channel / integration. But a social platform that helps with matching is really the key.

No space manager, no matter how good they are can keep the individual quirks of 100+ members in their head, especially when people are coming for extra events as well!

Increasing the Building of Community is the Holy Grail of Coworking!

And it is what will always set independent spaces apart from the big “coworking” operations.

Maybe we can push it further at GCUC in LA!

On Saturday, April 9, 2016 at 6:35:04 PM UTC+2, Alex Hillman wrote:

There’s a million ways to manage billing out there but nothing that actually helps us be better at our jobs. I’d kill for tools that actually helped with the community building process.

Every CRM-like tool is basically a “deal flow” manager or, at best, an account manager. I’d love something that actually helped me and my team build and cultivate stronger relationships with the people in my community. Ideally, it’s something that members get value from too, and not just a “management” tool.

We’ve tried everything we can find and still get more mileage out of our convoluted Frankenstein of spreadsheets, Trello, Wordpress, and custom software. I would be thrilled to pay to outsource this to something designed with community in mind.

-Alex

On Thursday, April 7, 2016, Rob Landry [email protected] wrote:

Hi Everyone,

For those of you who manage coworking spaces, I’m wondering - what would you like to see to improve coworking apps and make them more useful to you and your members?

I’m familiar with apps like Cobot and Coworkify, among others.

I started a coworking space a few years ago and built an app that works as a CMS for the website, handles billing of members, and a public member directory, among a few other things. The app is now used by a number of spaces. I’m ready to refine it

Thanks!

Rob
[email protected]

Visit this forum on the web at http://discuss.coworking.com


You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to [email protected].

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.
Join the list: http://coworkingweekly.com
Listen to the podcast: http://dangerouslyawesome.com/podcast

Visit this forum on the web at http://discuss.coworking.com


You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to [email protected].

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.
Join the list: http://coworkingweekly.com
Listen to the podcast: http://dangerouslyawesome.com/podcast

This is how we do things in Nadine here at Office Nomads. It’s really easy to automate things but from the very beginning we specifically pointed all automations at staff so that we can connect with members personally. Nadine sends us reminders when there are tasks that need to be done like take a member’s photo, or take their photo down from the wall when they leave. It also reminds us on member’s anniversary and other “special days” so we can celebrate with them the next time we see them in the space. On the member side it’s pretty simple but it does allow for member to post a little about themselves and check out what is going on.

All of Nadine is open source and I’ve love to build out the development and user communities if anyone is up for collaborating. To date I’ve spent more time referring people to Nexudus and Cobot then I have recruiting people to use nadine but if people are really interested in developing an open source tool, this is a great place to start.

Jacob

···

On Mon, Apr 11, 2016 at 1:02 PM, Alex Hillman [email protected] wrote:

I’m extremely skeptical of the leap to automation, especially when it’s paired with the idea of “matching.”

If relationships came down to a simple has/needs equation, maybe. But it’s much more nuanced than that. Dating sites have proven this for years. And I say this as someone who met his partner on a dating site.

There is an insane amount of low hanging fruit before we need anything that looks like automated matching.

Community Building isn’t a game of matching, it’s a game of trust building. The best way to build (and maintain!) trust at scale is to be looking for excuses for conversations, and keep track of what you learn over time. This helps individuals stay on top of things and teams “call the ball” before something happens, good or bad. It’s these conversations that help members feel felt, appreciated, heard, and understood.

  • “it’s been 2 weeks since Mary joined. Have you checked in with her to see how she’s doing?”
  • “if you checked in with Mary, reply with a couple of notes about your convo so the rest of your team knows how she’s doing too.”
  • “have you talked to any members this week who is having a tough time? Is there anything your team should know about that could make their lives easier, or conversation topics that might be worth avoiding?”
  • “next week is John’s three year anniversary anniversary of being a member. Let’s plan something special for him!”
  • “has anybody heard from George? It’s been 2 months since I saw any notes on his account. He might be looking to cancel soon if we lose touch.”
  • “these 25 people mentioned you on Twitter/Facebook/Instagram recently. Some might be members - remember to say thanks!”
  • “your event calendar is looking pretty empty next week. Maybe a good time to suggest a happy hour?”

Basically, I want a robot assistant that reminds me and my team to be an awesome human with our members and friends in the ecosystem. Light automation on top of data that a membership platform should have on hand.

We’ve barley started to cobble these kinds of reminders together along with our operational processes (http://dangerouslyawesome.com/2015/01/6-automated-workflows-that-make-our-coworking-space-better-every-day/) and it makes a HUGE difference for the team and their ability to support the community in ways that I know create MUCH more lasting, scalable value than a matching engine ever could hope to.

You’re right - it’s silly to expect that people keep this stuff in their head. But “matching” isn’t even on the list of tasks for our community team - that’s an outcome of doing the other stuff right.

-Alex

On Monday, April 11, 2016, Brian Crotty [email protected] wrote:

Hello Alex,

This was one of the topics that came up at our bi-annual Cobot retreat too. We have always had the tagline “More Time for your Coworkers” - because we feel that the primary way to build community is getting out there face to face and building community. But over the years, we have the feeling too that it is time to be more active on adding the community building and personal matching tools right into Cobot (coming soon to a software near you).

But that being said, I think that there are also a lot of ways to built it within the space with events and the matchmaking that comes through with it. That is also one of the keys of co-up, our own space. We have been hosting meet-ups, especially programming oriented meetups and don’t charge room rent as long as they don’t collect fees from the attendees. For us it has been perfect because we are know throughout the community for being the host, and for being a space where people can run into each other. We know who to refer questions too and there is something for everyone (who programms). It becomes the identity of the space.

**But how can that be automated? **

You need to open the space, coordinate meetings, find willing coordinators. be available. Sure the scheduling can be automated, but that is a small piece of the pie…

Where does software come into the picture then…

We are putting our bet on “intelligent matching”. Increasing serendipity. Right now the referrals, are coming through our staff, but we want someone in the Rails Girls group to be able to meetup with someone from the Coding Amigos if they are both currently working on a front-end web project. And to encourage people to contact people who arrive on other nights.

Some of this is done through our Slack channel / integration. But a social platform that helps with matching is really the key.

No space manager, no matter how good they are can keep the individual quirks of 100+ members in their head, especially when people are coming for extra events as well!

Increasing the Building of Community is the Holy Grail of Coworking!

And it is what will always set independent spaces apart from the big “coworking” operations.

Maybe we can push it further at GCUC in LA!

On Saturday, April 9, 2016 at 6:35:04 PM UTC+2, Alex Hillman wrote:

There’s a million ways to manage billing out there but nothing that actually helps us be better at our jobs. I’d kill for tools that actually helped with the community building process.

Every CRM-like tool is basically a “deal flow” manager or, at best, an account manager. I’d love something that actually helped me and my team build and cultivate stronger relationships with the people in my community. Ideally, it’s something that members get value from too, and not just a “management” tool.

We’ve tried everything we can find and still get more mileage out of our convoluted Frankenstein of spreadsheets, Trello, Wordpress, and custom software. I would be thrilled to pay to outsource this to something designed with community in mind.

-Alex

On Thursday, April 7, 2016, Rob Landry [email protected] wrote:

Hi Everyone,

For those of you who manage coworking spaces, I’m wondering - what would you like to see to improve coworking apps and make them more useful to you and your members?

I’m familiar with apps like Cobot and Coworkify, among others.

I started a coworking space a few years ago and built an app that works as a CMS for the website, handles billing of members, and a public member directory, among a few other things. The app is now used by a number of spaces. I’m ready to refine it

Thanks!

Rob
[email protected]

Visit this forum on the web at http://discuss.coworking.com


You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to [email protected].

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.
Join the list: http://coworkingweekly.com
Listen to the podcast: http://dangerouslyawesome.com/podcast

Visit this forum on the web at http://discuss.coworking.com


You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to [email protected].

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.
Join the list: http://coworkingweekly.com
Listen to the podcast: http://dangerouslyawesome.com/podcast

Visit this forum on the web at http://discuss.coworking.com


You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

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What you’re describing sounds remarkably like Razor’s Edge, which is what folks in the nonprofit fundraising world use to build, manage and ‘cultivate’ relationships with donors. The biggest difference would surely be on the side of the members’ usability (non-existent for donors in RE).

I’m fairly new to the coworking world and gearing up towards building a new coworking community in my area, but would love to stay in the loop with any conversations about collaborating on Nadine or Razor’s Edge-similiar.

Alanna
[email protected]

···

On Monday, April 11, 2016 at 5:01:18 PM UTC-4, Jacob Sayles wrote:

This is how we do things in Nadine here at Office Nomads. It’s really easy to automate things but from the very beginning we specifically pointed all automations at staff so that we can connect with members personally. Nadine sends us reminders when there are tasks that need to be done like take a member’s photo, or take their photo down from the wall when they leave. It also reminds us on member’s anniversary and other “special days” so we can celebrate with them the next time we see them in the space. On the member side it’s pretty simple but it does allow for member to post a little about themselves and check out what is going on.

All of Nadine is open source and I’ve love to build out the development and user communities if anyone is up for collaborating. To date I’ve spent more time referring people to Nexudus and Cobot then I have recruiting people to use nadine but if people are really interested in developing an open source tool, this is a great place to start.

Jacob

On Mon, Apr 11, 2016 at 1:02 PM, Alex Hillman [email protected] wrote:

I’m extremely skeptical of the leap to automation, especially when it’s paired with the idea of “matching.”

If relationships came down to a simple has/needs equation, maybe. But it’s much more nuanced than that. Dating sites have proven this for years. And I say this as someone who met his partner on a dating site.

There is an insane amount of low hanging fruit before we need anything that looks like automated matching.

Community Building isn’t a game of matching, it’s a game of trust building. The best way to build (and maintain!) trust at scale is to be looking for excuses for conversations, and keep track of what you learn over time. This helps individuals stay on top of things and teams “call the ball” before something happens, good or bad. It’s these conversations that help members feel felt, appreciated, heard, and understood.

  • “it’s been 2 weeks since Mary joined. Have you checked in with her to see how she’s doing?”
  • “if you checked in with Mary, reply with a couple of notes about your convo so the rest of your team knows how she’s doing too.”
  • “have you talked to any members this week who is having a tough time? Is there anything your team should know about that could make their lives easier, or conversation topics that might be worth avoiding?”
  • “next week is John’s three year anniversary anniversary of being a member. Let’s plan something special for him!”
  • “has anybody heard from George? It’s been 2 months since I saw any notes on his account. He might be looking to cancel soon if we lose touch.”
  • “these 25 people mentioned you on Twitter/Facebook/Instagram recently. Some might be members - remember to say thanks!”
  • “your event calendar is looking pretty empty next week. Maybe a good time to suggest a happy hour?”

Basically, I want a robot assistant that reminds me and my team to be an awesome human with our members and friends in the ecosystem. Light automation on top of data that a membership platform should have on hand.

We’ve barley started to cobble these kinds of reminders together along with our operational processes (http://dangerouslyawesome.com/2015/01/6-automated-workflows-that-make-our-coworking-space-better-every-day/) and it makes a HUGE difference for the team and their ability to support the community in ways that I know create MUCH more lasting, scalable value than a matching engine ever could hope to.

You’re right - it’s silly to expect that people keep this stuff in their head. But “matching” isn’t even on the list of tasks for our community team - that’s an outcome of doing the other stuff right.

-Alex

On Monday, April 11, 2016, Brian Crotty [email protected] wrote:

Hello Alex,

This was one of the topics that came up at our bi-annual Cobot retreat too. We have always had the tagline “More Time for your Coworkers” - because we feel that the primary way to build community is getting out there face to face and building community. But over the years, we have the feeling too that it is time to be more active on adding the community building and personal matching tools right into Cobot (coming soon to a software near you).

But that being said, I think that there are also a lot of ways to built it within the space with events and the matchmaking that comes through with it. That is also one of the keys of co-up, our own space. We have been hosting meet-ups, especially programming oriented meetups and don’t charge room rent as long as they don’t collect fees from the attendees. For us it has been perfect because we are know throughout the community for being the host, and for being a space where people can run into each other. We know who to refer questions too and there is something for everyone (who programms). It becomes the identity of the space.

**But how can that be automated? **

You need to open the space, coordinate meetings, find willing coordinators. be available. Sure the scheduling can be automated, but that is a small piece of the pie…

Where does software come into the picture then…

We are putting our bet on “intelligent matching”. Increasing serendipity. Right now the referrals, are coming through our staff, but we want someone in the Rails Girls group to be able to meetup with someone from the Coding Amigos if they are both currently working on a front-end web project. And to encourage people to contact people who arrive on other nights.

Some of this is done through our Slack channel / integration. But a social platform that helps with matching is really the key.

No space manager, no matter how good they are can keep the individual quirks of 100+ members in their head, especially when people are coming for extra events as well!

Increasing the Building of Community is the Holy Grail of Coworking!

And it is what will always set independent spaces apart from the big “coworking” operations.

Maybe we can push it further at GCUC in LA!

On Saturday, April 9, 2016 at 6:35:04 PM UTC+2, Alex Hillman wrote:

There’s a million ways to manage billing out there but nothing that actually helps us be better at our jobs. I’d kill for tools that actually helped with the community building process.

Every CRM-like tool is basically a “deal flow” manager or, at best, an account manager. I’d love something that actually helped me and my team build and cultivate stronger relationships with the people in my community. Ideally, it’s something that members get value from too, and not just a “management” tool.

We’ve tried everything we can find and still get more mileage out of our convoluted Frankenstein of spreadsheets, Trello, Wordpress, and custom software. I would be thrilled to pay to outsource this to something designed with community in mind.

-Alex

On Thursday, April 7, 2016, Rob Landry [email protected] wrote:

Hi Everyone,

For those of you who manage coworking spaces, I’m wondering - what would you like to see to improve coworking apps and make them more useful to you and your members?

I’m familiar with apps like Cobot and Coworkify, among others.

I started a coworking space a few years ago and built an app that works as a CMS for the website, handles billing of members, and a public member directory, among a few other things. The app is now used by a number of spaces. I’m ready to refine it

Thanks!

Rob
[email protected]

Visit this forum on the web at http://discuss.coworking.com


You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to [email protected].

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.
Join the list: http://coworkingweekly.com
Listen to the podcast: http://dangerouslyawesome.com/podcast

Visit this forum on the web at http://discuss.coworking.com


You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

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The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.
Join the list: http://coworkingweekly.com
Listen to the podcast: http://dangerouslyawesome.com/podcast

Visit this forum on the web at http://discuss.coworking.com


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Hi Everyone!

Short intro, I’m Bart and I am one of the founders of mr.Watson, which is a private social network for coworking spaces, located in The Netherlands. We have had a focus on the community part from the beginning on. Creating a platform that is focused on building trust and stimulating and facilitating bottom-up initiative. By giving members the opportunity to get in touch with each other easily, setting up events them selfs, managing shared facilities etc. We are traditionally coming from the member side, instead of the community management side. The spaces we were visiting and located in ourselves back then were not that well managed. So we started building our tool as a tool for the members to get more value from the community by themselves. Just after a while we started moving from that positions to being a tool for coworking spaces and shared offices in a broader sense.

One thing we learned, developing our product, is the possibilities of integrating the social and the practical / management part. We always had the idea to integrate our social approach with the practical / managerial part, with mr.Watson as ‘the member focused front-end’. As soon as we started doing this and integrated room booking software and a fix-it service application we saw what integrating practical tools in a social environment could do. You could say online got the ‘coffee machine effect’ as well. As you go to the coffee machine for a cup of coffee (practical reason) you bumb into a coworker, sharing at least a simple and short, trust enhancing, shared experience. Online we saw that members that were difficult to involve in the social part to start of with did go to mr.Watson to book a room (practical), while being there they saw the faces, names, events and conversations going on and, when relevant, they started participating themselves as well. Eventually these members got more and more involved socially both on- and offline.

Like Alex said, I also believe that trust building is a great part and we try to bring this into our product. In such a way that members feel the confidence to start playing an active role in the community (building) as well. We are learning every day and are looking to add new trust building elements (coming soon: the facegame) and integrate with practical / management tools as well (would love to get in touch with you guys at Cobot as well!).

···

Op zaterdag 9 april 2016 17:32:27 UTC+2 schreef Rob Landry:

Hi Everyone,

For those of you who manage coworking spaces, I’m wondering - what would you like to see to improve coworking apps and make them more useful to you and your members?

I’m familiar with apps like Cobot and Coworkify, among others.

I started a coworking space a few years ago and built an app that works as a CMS for the website, handles billing of members, and a public member directory, among a few other things. The app is now used by a number of spaces. I’m ready to refine it

Thanks!

Rob
[email protected]

Hello Alex,

That makes a lot of sense. And maybe I wasn’t clear enough earlier - that is what our space experiences too, the automated matching has limited benefits, the meet-ups, the group lunches - those are the real serendipity.

Cobot also has a Zapier Integration (When a new member in Cobot signs up or cancels, you can trigger a bunch of other stuff to happen in other programs, reminders on the calendar, tasks on Trello, etc.) We have been using it in co-up primarily for exiting members, but that is a really good idea to give reminders to the space managers for all the “extras” that bring through the personal touch.

But I guess my only remaining question is, that is a way to make an individual feel welcomed, but how can a software help really integrate them into the community (or can it?). I often think that the more we turn to technology for solutions, the more we realize that spending the human time together is the real key. Which brings us right back to Cobot giving more time!

But we also plan to bring a social platform (facebook light) into Cobot in the near future.

Brian

We appear to be part of the momentary Zeitgeist.

Check out the most recent webinar from Coshare:

Creating Community

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z-OU9nHHPUs

Here’s what I would do if I had the knowledge…
In Cobot, I would add all these neat reminders and tasks like birthdays or 2 week followups but it would be open and visible to ALL members so the members could choose to do a task FOR ANOTHER MEMBER and check it off.

Angel

···

On Saturday, April 9, 2016 at 9:32:27 AM UTC-6, Rob Landry wrote:

Hi Everyone,

For those of you who manage coworking spaces, I’m wondering - what would you like to see to improve coworking apps and make them more useful to you and your members?

I’m familiar with apps like Cobot and Coworkify, among others.

I started a coworking space a few years ago and built an app that works as a CMS for the website, handles billing of members, and a public member directory, among a few other things. The app is now used by a number of spaces. I’m ready to refine it

Thanks!

Rob
[email protected]

100% 100% 100%

···

On Wednesday, April 13, 2016, Angel Kwiatkowski [email protected] wrote:

Here’s what I would do if I had the knowledge…
In Cobot, I would add all these neat reminders and tasks like birthdays or 2 week followups but it would be open and visible to ALL members so the members could choose to do a task FOR ANOTHER MEMBER and check it off.

Angel

On Saturday, April 9, 2016 at 9:32:27 AM UTC-6, Rob Landry wrote:

Hi Everyone,

For those of you who manage coworking spaces, I’m wondering - what would you like to see to improve coworking apps and make them more useful to you and your members?

I’m familiar with apps like Cobot and Coworkify, among others.

I started a coworking space a few years ago and built an app that works as a CMS for the website, handles billing of members, and a public member directory, among a few other things. The app is now used by a number of spaces. I’m ready to refine it

Thanks!

Rob
[email protected]

Visit this forum on the web at http://discuss.coworking.com


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The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.
Join the list: http://coworkingweekly.com
Listen to the podcast: http://dangerouslyawesome.com/podcast

Taken to heart Angel.
Let me see what we can cook up…

···

On Thursday, April 14, 2016 at 2:18:11 AM UTC+2, Angel Kwiatkowski wrote:

Here’s what I would do if I had the knowledge…
In Cobot, I would add all these neat reminders and tasks like birthdays or 2 week followups but it would be open and visible to ALL members so the members could choose to do a task FOR ANOTHER MEMBER and check it off.

Angel

On Saturday, April 9, 2016 at 9:32:27 AM UTC-6, Rob Landry wrote:

Hi Everyone,

For those of you who manage coworking spaces, I’m wondering - what would you like to see to improve coworking apps and make them more useful to you and your members?

I’m familiar with apps like Cobot and Coworkify, among others.

I started a coworking space a few years ago and built an app that works as a CMS for the website, handles billing of members, and a public member directory, among a few other things. The app is now used by a number of spaces. I’m ready to refine it

Thanks!

Rob
[email protected]

Hello Angel,

Here is our thought.

We already have our Zapier Integration with Cobot - I am sure you already know, so:

  1. A New Member comes into Cobot, then they can trigger a new Member To-Do list to be created in Trello. (via Zapier)

  2. The to-do list can have all your basic welcome tasks and include stuff from the member signup like name, plan, start date, extras, etc.

  3. You make that Trello to-do list shared by your member “Welcome Committee” (a group of your favorite members who help you with the space and take on those welcome tasks.

  4. In theory you can make two or three different task lists so that you have a to-do list when they are first welcomed, a new one after 6 months, etc.

That is the start - we will be looking to build that out even further in the future because we totally agree that ways to involve the community are critical to your space running well.

Brian

···

On Friday, April 15, 2016 at 12:17:41 AM UTC+2, Brian Crotty wrote:

Taken to heart Angel.
Let me see what we can cook up…

On Thursday, April 14, 2016 at 2:18:11 AM UTC+2, Angel Kwiatkowski wrote:

Here’s what I would do if I had the knowledge…
In Cobot, I would add all these neat reminders and tasks like birthdays or 2 week followups but it would be open and visible to ALL members so the members could choose to do a task FOR ANOTHER MEMBER and check it off.

Angel

On Saturday, April 9, 2016 at 9:32:27 AM UTC-6, Rob Landry wrote:

Hi Everyone,

For those of you who manage coworking spaces, I’m wondering - what would you like to see to improve coworking apps and make them more useful to you and your members?

I’m familiar with apps like Cobot and Coworkify, among others.

I started a coworking space a few years ago and built an app that works as a CMS for the website, handles billing of members, and a public member directory, among a few other things. The app is now used by a number of spaces. I’m ready to refine it

Thanks!

Rob
[email protected]

Hi Brian,
Thank you for this workflow! I’m not super familiar with Trello yet so I’ll have to dig in there. I do use Zapier with cobot and WooCommerce and google calendar and slack and mailchimp so that’s been amazing. Love the idea of a welcome committee.

···

On Monday, April 25, 2016 at 3:19:29 PM UTC-6, Brian Crotty wrote:

Hello Angel,

Here is our thought.

We already have our Zapier Integration with Cobot - I am sure you already know, so:

  1. A New Member comes into Cobot, then they can trigger a new Member To-Do list to be created in Trello. (via Zapier)
  1. The to-do list can have all your basic welcome tasks and include stuff from the member signup like name, plan, start date, extras, etc.
  1. You make that Trello to-do list shared by your member “Welcome Committee” (a group of your favorite members who help you with the space and take on those welcome tasks.
  1. In theory you can make two or three different task lists so that you have a to-do list when they are first welcomed, a new one after 6 months, etc.

That is the start - we will be looking to build that out even further in the future because we totally agree that ways to involve the community are critical to your space running well.

Brian

On Friday, April 15, 2016 at 12:17:41 AM UTC+2, Brian Crotty wrote:

Taken to heart Angel.
Let me see what we can cook up…

On Thursday, April 14, 2016 at 2:18:11 AM UTC+2, Angel Kwiatkowski wrote:

Here’s what I would do if I had the knowledge…
In Cobot, I would add all these neat reminders and tasks like birthdays or 2 week followups but it would be open and visible to ALL members so the members could choose to do a task FOR ANOTHER MEMBER and check it off.

Angel

On Saturday, April 9, 2016 at 9:32:27 AM UTC-6, Rob Landry wrote:

Hi Everyone,

For those of you who manage coworking spaces, I’m wondering - what would you like to see to improve coworking apps and make them more useful to you and your members?

I’m familiar with apps like Cobot and Coworkify, among others.

I started a coworking space a few years ago and built an app that works as a CMS for the website, handles billing of members, and a public member directory, among a few other things. The app is now used by a number of spaces. I’m ready to refine it

Thanks!

Rob
[email protected]