Getting rid of the "co-working" hyphen

Hi All,

I’ve done a little research trying to figure out how we might move forward in trying to persuade the AP to reconsider their position on the co-working vs. coworking issue. Most of what follows is less of a concrete plan, and more of the background info we would need in deciding where/how to focus our efforts:

**1. Webster’s New World College Dictionary (WNWCD) is the official dictionary for the AP Stylebook. **

· Interestingly, and importantly, the WNWCD is not published by Meriam Webster, but by Houghton Mifflin.

· There will be differences, then, between WNWCD’s and Meriam-Webster’s treatment of terms.

· So, if we want to begin by getting coworking into a dictionary, it seems like focusing our attention on the WNWCD would be best.

· BUT…. The AP’s rules of spelling, grammar, etc. don’t always match the WNWCD.

  •   For example, the AP spells email without a hyphen, while *WNWCD*’s primary definition retains the hyphen.
    

· So, if WNWCD adds coworking to their dictionary it wouldn’t necessarily result in a change in the AP’s approach to spelling co-working.

  •   Although the AP Stylebooks’s values are listed as consistency, clarity, accuracy, and brevity, they definitely seem to be privileging consistency in their continued use of co-working.  (We’ve always spelled it this way and will continue to do so…)
    

· Finally, the WNWCD just issued its first print revision in decades on August 26. I am guessing that another print edition will not come out for some time. We might lobby for the addition of coworking now, but it would be a while before we saw the change in print.

  •   The online version of *WNWCD* probably publishes updates more regularly, but I can’t view their editorial policy without a subscription.
    

**2. **If we want to argue with the editor(s) at the AP Stylebook directly, we will need a subscription.

· As far as I can tell only subscribers can submit questions to the editor and view the complete archive of past Q and As to the editor.

  • A yearly subscription to the AP Style Guide is $26.

**3. **Why does the New York Times use “coworking” when speaking of the Coworking Visa, but not in other cases, as Jacob mentioned in his post?

· Although the New York Times uses the WNWCD, they have their very own style guide that conflicts with the AP’s style guide on many points

**4. **So, what are our options?

· We can work to have coworking included in various dictionaries. This may not impact the AP Stylebook, but it would contribute to making the distinction between co-working and coworking clearer and bring general awareness to the issue.

  •   I would be happy to do some research on how different dictionaries treat address the issue of co-working v. coworking if at all, and what the editorial policies are for adding/amending entries. 
    

· Tweet our discontent

  •   As Carsten Foertsch suggested in his article for deskmag:  @APStylebook #Coworking is not Co-working.  It’s an independent movement that doesn’t want to be separated by a hyphen!
    
  •   This was suggested in 2011, however, and there hasn’t been much activity since.  Do we want to revitalize this? Perhaps come up with a new hashtag?
    
  •  Does anyone have other ideas? 
    

Hopefully this info will be useful when deciding what steps to take next!

···


Lauren Grant

Office Nomads

officenomads.com
206-323-6500

Lauren, this is really really handy to know!

Does anyone on this group have an active AP Stylebook subscription?

···

On Friday, September 19, 2014, Lauren M Grant la[email protected] wrote:

Hi All,

I’ve done a little research trying to figure out how we might move forward in trying to persuade the AP to reconsider their position on the co-working vs. coworking issue. Most of what follows is less of a concrete plan, and more of the background info we would need in deciding where/how to focus our efforts:

**1. Webster’s New World College Dictionary (WNWCD) is the official dictionary for the AP Stylebook. **

· Interestingly, and importantly, the WNWCD is not published by Meriam Webster, but by Houghton Mifflin.

· There will be differences, then, between WNWCD’s and Meriam-Webster’s treatment of terms.

· So, if we want to begin by getting coworking into a dictionary, it seems like focusing our attention on the WNWCD would be best.

· BUT…. The AP’s rules of spelling, grammar, etc. don’t always match the WNWCD.

  •   For example, the AP spells email without a hyphen, while *WNWCD*’s primary definition retains the hyphen.
    

· So, if WNWCD adds coworking to their dictionary it wouldn’t necessarily result in a change in the AP’s approach to spelling co-working.

  •   Although the AP Stylebooks’s values are listed as consistency, clarity, accuracy, and brevity, they definitely seem to be privileging consistency in their continued use of co-working.  (We’ve always spelled it this way and will continue to do so…)
    

· Finally, the WNWCD just issued its first print revision in decades on August 26. I am guessing that another print edition will not come out for some time. We might lobby for the addition of coworking now, but it would be a while before we saw the change in print.

  •   The online version of *WNWCD* probably publishes updates more regularly, but I can’t view their editorial policy without a subscription.
    

**2. **If we want to argue with the editor(s) at the AP Stylebook directly, we will need a subscription.

· As far as I can tell only subscribers can submit questions to the editor and view the complete archive of past Q and As to the editor.

  • A yearly subscription to the AP Style Guide is $26.

**3. **Why does the New York Times use “coworking” when speaking of the Coworking Visa, but not in other cases, as Jacob mentioned in his post?

· Although the New York Times uses the WNWCD, they have their very own style guide that conflicts with the AP’s style guide on many points

**4. **So, what are our options?

· We can work to have coworking included in various dictionaries. This may not impact the AP Stylebook, but it would contribute to making the distinction between co-working and coworking clearer and bring general awareness to the issue.

  •   I would be happy to do some research on how different dictionaries treat address the issue of co-working v. coworking if at all, and what the editorial policies are for adding/amending entries. 
    

· Tweet our discontent

  •   As Carsten Foertsch suggested in his article for deskmag:  @APStylebook #Coworking is not Co-working.  It’s an independent movement that doesn’t want to be separated by a hyphen!
    
  •   This was suggested in 2011, however, and there hasn’t been much activity since.  Do we want to revitalize this? Perhaps come up with a new hashtag?
    
  •  Does anyone have other ideas? 
    

Hopefully this info will be useful when deciding what steps to take next!


Lauren Grant

Office Nomads

officenomads.com
206-323-6500

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We can always send a letter by post :wink:

Hi Lauren,

I’d be interested in hearing what you have done with this since 2014. Any progress? I had recently posted a question here on this topic as well, and was directed to your original post. In New Mexico the prominent business journal is publishing a new coworking list but using “co-working” because of AP guidelines.

I’d be willing to support a social media / hashtag campaign, which you mention below. Has anything been done with this yet?

Lauren

···

On Friday, September 19, 2014 at 11:52:08 AM UTC-6, Lauren M Grant wrote:

Hi All,

I’ve done a little research trying to figure out how we might move forward in trying to persuade the AP to reconsider their position on the co-working vs. coworking issue. Most of what follows is less of a concrete plan, and more of the background info we would need in deciding where/how to focus our efforts:

**1. Webster’s New World College Dictionary (WNWCD) is the official dictionary for the AP Stylebook. **

· Interestingly, and importantly, the WNWCD is not published by Meriam Webster, but by Houghton Mifflin.

· There will be differences, then, between WNWCD’s and Meriam-Webster’s treatment of terms.

· So, if we want to begin by getting coworking into a dictionary, it seems like focusing our attention on the WNWCD would be best.

· BUT…. The AP’s rules of spelling, grammar, etc. don’t always match the WNWCD.

  •   For example, the AP spells email without a hyphen, while *WNWCD*’s primary definition retains the hyphen.
    

· So, if WNWCD adds coworking to their dictionary it wouldn’t necessarily result in a change in the AP’s approach to spelling co-working.

  •   Although the AP Stylebooks’s values are listed as consistency, clarity, accuracy, and brevity, they definitely seem to be privileging consistency in their continued use of co-working.  (We’ve always spelled it this way and will continue to do so…)
    

· Finally, the WNWCD just issued its first print revision in decades on August 26. I am guessing that another print edition will not come out for some time. We might lobby for the addition of coworking now, but it would be a while before we saw the change in print.

  •   The online version of *WNWCD* probably publishes updates more regularly, but I can’t view their editorial policy without a subscription.
    

**2. **If we want to argue with the editor(s) at the AP Stylebook directly, we will need a subscription.

· As far as I can tell only subscribers can submit questions to the editor and view the complete archive of past Q and As to the editor.

  • A yearly subscription to the AP Style Guide is $26.

**3. **Why does the New York Times use “coworking” when speaking of the Coworking Visa, but not in other cases, as Jacob mentioned in his post?

· Although the New York Times uses the WNWCD, they have their very own style guide that conflicts with the AP’s style guide on many points

**4. **So, what are our options?

· We can work to have coworking included in various dictionaries. This may not impact the AP Stylebook, but it would contribute to making the distinction between co-working and coworking clearer and bring general awareness to the issue.

  •   I would be happy to do some research on how different dictionaries treat address the issue of co-working v. coworking if at all, and what the editorial policies are for adding/amending entries. 
    

· Tweet our discontent

  •   As Carsten Foertsch suggested in his article for deskmag:  @APStylebook #Coworking is not Co-working.  It’s an independent movement that doesn’t want to be separated by a hyphen!
    
  •   This was suggested in 2011, however, and there hasn’t been much activity since.  Do we want to revitalize this? Perhaps come up with a new hashtag?
    
  •  Does anyone have other ideas? 
    

Hopefully this info will be useful when deciding what steps to take next!


Lauren Grant

Office Nomads

officenomads.com
206-323-6500

Hi Lauren!

Lauren Grant (who started this thread) no longer is active in the coworking world so I’m not sure what the status is. But I’m sure any efforts you make would be useful. :slight_smile:

In other interesting news, a couple of our members recently noticed that the trend of using the hyphen seems to being beaten back by people not hyphenating. Or at least so says Google! I attached a screenshot of the most recent comparison I did. Take a look!

Otherwise I regularly point people to http://doescoworkinghaveahyphen.com/ (thanks Alex!!). That tends to make them laugh and make a point all at the same time.

Anyway, that’s the update from here!

Take care,

Susan

···

__
Office Nomads
officenomads.com

On Tue, Mar 27, 2018 at 8:33 AM, Lauren McDaniel [email protected] wrote:

Hi Lauren,

I’d be interested in hearing what you have done with this since 2014. Any progress? I had recently posted a question here on this topic as well, and was directed to your original post. In New Mexico the prominent business journal is publishing a new coworking list but using “co-working” because of AP guidelines.

I’d be willing to support a social media / hashtag campaign, which you mention below. Has anything been done with this yet?

Lauren

On Friday, September 19, 2014 at 11:52:08 AM UTC-6, Lauren M Grant wrote:

Hi All,

I’ve done a little research trying to figure out how we might move forward in trying to persuade the AP to reconsider their position on the co-working vs. coworking issue. Most of what follows is less of a concrete plan, and more of the background info we would need in deciding where/how to focus our efforts:

**1. Webster’s New World College Dictionary (WNWCD) is the official dictionary for the AP Stylebook. **

· Interestingly, and importantly, the WNWCD is not published by Meriam Webster, but by Houghton Mifflin.

· There will be differences, then, between WNWCD’s and Meriam-Webster’s treatment of terms.

· So, if we want to begin by getting coworking into a dictionary, it seems like focusing our attention on the WNWCD would be best.

· BUT…. The AP’s rules of spelling, grammar, etc. don’t always match the WNWCD.

  •   For example, the AP spells email without a hyphen, while *WNWCD*’s primary definition retains the hyphen.
    

· So, if WNWCD adds coworking to their dictionary it wouldn’t necessarily result in a change in the AP’s approach to spelling co-working.

  •   Although the AP Stylebooks’s values are listed as consistency, clarity, accuracy, and brevity, they definitely seem to be privileging consistency in their continued use of co-working.  (We’ve always spelled it this way and will continue to do so…)
    

· Finally, the WNWCD just issued its first print revision in decades on August 26. I am guessing that another print edition will not come out for some time. We might lobby for the addition of coworking now, but it would be a while before we saw the change in print.

  •   The online version of *WNWCD* probably publishes updates more regularly, but I can’t view their editorial policy without a subscription.
    

**2. **If we want to argue with the editor(s) at the AP Stylebook directly, we will need a subscription.

· As far as I can tell only subscribers can submit questions to the editor and view the complete archive of past Q and As to the editor.

  • A yearly subscription to the AP Style Guide is $26.

**3. **Why does the New York Times use “coworking” when speaking of the Coworking Visa, but not in other cases, as Jacob mentioned in his post?

· Although the New York Times uses the WNWCD, they have their very own style guide that conflicts with the AP’s style guide on many points

**4. **So, what are our options?

· We can work to have coworking included in various dictionaries. This may not impact the AP Stylebook, but it would contribute to making the distinction between co-working and coworking clearer and bring general awareness to the issue.

  •   I would be happy to do some research on how different dictionaries treat address the issue of co-working v. coworking if at all, and what the editorial policies are for adding/amending entries. 
    

· Tweet our discontent

  •   As Carsten Foertsch suggested in his article for deskmag:  @APStylebook #Coworking is not Co-working.  It’s an independent movement that doesn’t want to be separated by a hyphen!
    
  •   This was suggested in 2011, however, and there hasn’t been much activity since.  Do we want to revitalize this? Perhaps come up with a new hashtag?
    
  •  Does anyone have other ideas? 
    

Hopefully this info will be useful when deciding what steps to take next!


Lauren Grant

Office Nomads

officenomads.com
206-323-6500


You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

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