Extending wifi range

Wifi repeaters…kind of suck. You’ve gotta figure you’re taking a relatively unreliable wireless connection, trying to catch it out of the air, and then rebroadcast it. There’s SO much that can go wrong unless you have high end point-to-point gear.

It’s worth running even a single Ethernet cable to connect a switch in your new space into your existing system, and then patch new wireless access points into the switch. Even if you go on the higher end of consumer, unmanaged switches (like Netgear, ~$100), you’ll get MUCH better performance than trying to repeat wifi.

-Alex

···

On Thursday, April 9, 2015, Jensen Yancey [email protected] wrote:

So, we’re in the process of expanding our location (in the same building, taking over our neighbor’s space) and the wifi doesn’t quite reach to the edges of the new space, what’s the best way to get great coverage for the whole building?

Jensen

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The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.

Join the list: http://coworkingweekly.com

Listen to the podcast: http://dangerouslyawesome.com/podcast

If you can find a company that provides full service -- equipment and maintenance at high quality -- then I would recommend that. At Collective Agency, wifi cost is low relative to value. I also have a backup network with another provider: in case one provider has upstream issues, the other works. We have 5,000 square feet and 4 access points on the main network, and 3 access points on the backup network, each with two network names to make connecting to the nearest access points controlled by the member, not their computer.

My problem with repeaters is that people keep moving them. Then because they are koff idiot proof, they go hunting a network, and pick up my neighbors’ wifi instead.

THis is probably only a problem in densely populated areas. But I am going to duct tape that sucker down if it happens again.

···

On Friday, April 10, 2015 at 3:57:54 AM UTC+2, Alex Hillman wrote:

Wifi repeaters…kind of suck. You’ve gotta figure you’re taking a relatively unreliable wireless connection, trying to catch it out of the air, and then rebroadcast it. There’s SO much that can go wrong unless you have high end point-to-point gear.

It’s worth running even a single Ethernet cable to connect a switch in your new space into your existing system, and then patch new wireless access points into the switch. Even if you go on the higher end of consumer, unmanaged switches (like Netgear, ~$100), you’ll get MUCH better performance than trying to repeat wifi.

-Alex

On Thursday, April 9, 2015, Jensen Yancey [email protected] wrote:

So, we’re in the process of expanding our location (in the same building, taking over our neighbor’s space) and the wifi doesn’t quite reach to the edges of the new space, what’s the best way to get great coverage for the whole building?

Jensen

Visit this forum on the web at http://discuss.coworking.com


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The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.

Join the list: http://coworkingweekly.com

Listen to the podcast: http://dangerouslyawesome.com/podcast

Curious: do all these AP's cause radio signal interference? Or do you have them set on just 2?

Also curious: would another solution be to have some load balancer (??) at the switch or Internet modem level so that if one network goes down the other activates?

Jerome

···

On Apr 10, 2015, at 1:14 AM, Alex Linsker <[email protected]> wrote:

If you can find a company that provides full service -- equipment and maintenance at high quality -- then I would recommend that. At Collective Agency, wifi cost is low relative to value. I also have a backup network with another provider: in case one provider has upstream issues, the other works. We have 5,000 square feet and 4 access points on the main network, and 3 access points on the backup network, each with two network names to make connecting to the nearest access points controlled by the member, not their computer.

--
Visit this forum on the web at http://discuss.coworking.com
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What you need are some UniFi access points. They are commercial-grade access points, similar to what a college campus, hospital, or any other facility where they need a single wifi network, but multiple access points to provide blanket coverage.

The base model, the UniFi AP, goes for like $200 for a three-pack. They are standard 2.4/5ghz Wireless N access points. They come with everything you need except the ethernet cable… It comes with the mounting base plate, brackets for drop ceilings, and the PoE injector. There are faster (WirelessAC), and outdoor-ready models too, that of course cost more. You configure the network (including advanced features like guest networks) via software that runs on a computer.

Keep in mind that these are ONLY access points. You still need a router.

Does UniFi have a cloud app to manage these AP’s or just computer-based app?

Jerome

···

On Apr 10, 2015, at 7:23 AM, Shannon Hicks [email protected] wrote:

What you need are some UniFi access points. They are commercial-grade access points, similar to what a college campus, hospital, or any other facility where they need a single wifi network, but multiple access points to provide blanket coverage.

The base model, the UniFi AP, goes for like $200 for a three-pack. They are standard 2.4/5ghz Wireless N access points. They come with everything you need except the ethernet cable… It comes with the mounting base plate, brackets for drop ceilings, and the PoE injector. There are faster (WirelessAC), and outdoor-ready models too, that of course cost more. You configure the network (including advanced features like guest networks) via software that runs on a computer.

Keep in mind that these are ONLY access points. You still need a router.

Visit this forum on the web at http://discuss.coworking.com


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They don’t offer it as a service but there are a bunch of walkthroughs out there for installing the controller software on an AWS instance.

-Alex

···

On Friday, April 10, 2015, Jerome Chang [email protected] wrote:

Does UniFi have a cloud app to manage these AP’s or just computer-based app?

Jerome

On Apr 10, 2015, at 7:23 AM, Shannon Hicks [email protected] wrote:

What you need are some UniFi access points. They are commercial-grade access points, similar to what a college campus, hospital, or any other facility where they need a single wifi network, but multiple access points to provide blanket coverage.

The base model, the UniFi AP, goes for like $200 for a three-pack. They are standard 2.4/5ghz Wireless N access points. They come with everything you need except the ethernet cable… It comes with the mounting base plate, brackets for drop ceilings, and the PoE injector. There are faster (WirelessAC), and outdoor-ready models too, that of course cost more. You configure the network (including advanced features like guest networks) via software that runs on a computer.

Keep in mind that these are ONLY access points. You still need a router.

Visit this forum on the web at http://discuss.coworking.com


You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

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Visit this forum on the web at http://discuss.coworking.com


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The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.

Join the list: http://coworkingweekly.com

Listen to the podcast: http://dangerouslyawesome.com/podcast

I misspoke… The base model is 2.4Ghz only… which for internet access is plenty.

There’s no cloud app to manage it. However, typically those cloud-managed solutions (Like Cisco’s Meraki products) you not only have to buy the hardware, but you have to pay yearly fees for the software too. This is buy & you’re done.

In theory, you could set up a tiny cloud VPC to run the software… but it would need full-time VPN access into your network (and be publicly secure) for optimal results.

If this info is useful to you guys, here’s my Amazon affiliate link to the product :slight_smile:

Ubiquiti Networks UniFi AP Enterprise WiFi System UAP-3 (Pack of 3)

Shan

···

On Friday, April 10, 2015 at 9:30:33 AM UTC-5, Jerome wrote:

Does UniFi have a cloud app to manage these AP’s or just computer-based app?

Jerome

On Apr 10, 2015, at 7:23 AM, Shannon Hicks [email protected] wrote:

What you need are some UniFi access points. They are commercial-grade access points, similar to what a college campus, hospital, or any other facility where they need a single wifi network, but multiple access points to provide blanket coverage.

The base model, the UniFi AP, goes for like $200 for a three-pack. They are standard 2.4/5ghz Wireless N access points. They come with everything you need except the ethernet cable… It comes with the mounting base plate, brackets for drop ceilings, and the PoE injector. There are faster (WirelessAC), and outdoor-ready models too, that of course cost more. You configure the network (including advanced features like guest networks) via software that runs on a computer.

Keep in mind that these are ONLY access points. You still need a router.

Visit this forum on the web at http://discuss.coworking.com


You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

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We’re opening a cowork space that’s about 14,000 sq.ft. A little large but that’s the way it worked out in the building we have. We’re using a combination of UniFi Ap and AC access points and in testing I like them. We’ll see what happens when we go live after our grand opening. So far the coworkers in there haven’t had any issues. You can run the UniFi access points without a computer controlling them, but to do some things like the captive portal you need Unifi controller software running. Since it was the only thing I needed a pc for I purchased $189 Zotac Pico pc and the controller software runs there.

···

On Friday, April 10, 2015 at 10:52:30 AM UTC-4, Shannon Hicks wrote:

I misspoke… The base model is 2.4Ghz only… which for internet access is plenty.

There’s no cloud app to manage it. However, typically those cloud-managed solutions (Like Cisco’s Meraki products) you not only have to buy the hardware, but you have to pay yearly fees for the software too. This is buy & you’re done.

In theory, you could set up a tiny cloud VPC to run the software… but it would need full-time VPN access into your network (and be publicly secure) for optimal results.

If this info is useful to you guys, here’s my Amazon affiliate link to the product :slight_smile:

Ubiquiti Networks UniFi AP Enterprise WiFi System UAP-3 (Pack of 3)

Shan

On Friday, April 10, 2015 at 9:30:33 AM UTC-5, Jerome wrote:

Does UniFi have a cloud app to manage these AP’s or just computer-based app?

Jerome

On Apr 10, 2015, at 7:23 AM, Shannon Hicks [email protected] wrote:

What you need are some UniFi access points. They are commercial-grade access points, similar to what a college campus, hospital, or any other facility where they need a single wifi network, but multiple access points to provide blanket coverage.

The base model, the UniFi AP, goes for like $200 for a three-pack. They are standard 2.4/5ghz Wireless N access points. They come with everything you need except the ethernet cable… It comes with the mounting base plate, brackets for drop ceilings, and the PoE injector. There are faster (WirelessAC), and outdoor-ready models too, that of course cost more. You configure the network (including advanced features like guest networks) via software that runs on a computer.

Keep in mind that these are ONLY access points. You still need a router.

Visit this forum on the web at http://discuss.coworking.com


You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to [email protected].

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You can run the UniFi access points without a computer controlling them, but to do some things like the captive portal you need Unifi controller software running.

You CAN run the access points without the controller software…but you lose more than the captive portal. The controller software does a lot of really smart handling of channel interference, signal strengths, load balancing across multiple APs, even device handoffs so that as people move through the space they don’t get disconnected.

It’s really pretty amazing, and we took it for granted until our computer that ran the software was out of commission for a week. The wifi was MUCH less stable without the controller software running, especially since we’re in an area where signal interference is often a challenge.

It’s also really handy for debugging issues, and noticing patterns in usage.

I wouldn’t skip running it - and Jacques’ tip on grabbing a cheap PC to run it on is great!

-Alex

···

On Sat, Apr 11, 2015 at 10:31 PM, Jacques Paquin [email protected] wrote:

We’re opening a cowork space that’s about 14,000 sq.ft. A little large but that’s the way it worked out in the building we have. We’re using a combination of UniFi Ap and AC access points and in testing I like them. We’ll see what happens when we go live after our grand opening. So far the coworkers in there haven’t had any issues. You can run the UniFi access points without a computer controlling them, but to do some things like the captive portal you need Unifi controller software running. Since it was the only thing I needed a pc for I purchased $189 Zotac Pico pc and the controller software runs there.

On Friday, April 10, 2015 at 10:52:30 AM UTC-4, Shannon Hicks wrote:

I misspoke… The base model is 2.4Ghz only… which for internet access is plenty.

There’s no cloud app to manage it. However, typically those cloud-managed solutions (Like Cisco’s Meraki products) you not only have to buy the hardware, but you have to pay yearly fees for the software too. This is buy & you’re done.

In theory, you could set up a tiny cloud VPC to run the software… but it would need full-time VPN access into your network (and be publicly secure) for optimal results.

If this info is useful to you guys, here’s my Amazon affiliate link to the product :slight_smile:

Ubiquiti Networks UniFi AP Enterprise WiFi System UAP-3 (Pack of 3)

Shan

On Friday, April 10, 2015 at 9:30:33 AM UTC-5, Jerome wrote:

Does UniFi have a cloud app to manage these AP’s or just computer-based app?

Jerome

On Apr 10, 2015, at 7:23 AM, Shannon Hicks [email protected] wrote:

What you need are some UniFi access points. They are commercial-grade access points, similar to what a college campus, hospital, or any other facility where they need a single wifi network, but multiple access points to provide blanket coverage.

The base model, the UniFi AP, goes for like $200 for a three-pack. They are standard 2.4/5ghz Wireless N access points. They come with everything you need except the ethernet cable… It comes with the mounting base plate, brackets for drop ceilings, and the PoE injector. There are faster (WirelessAC), and outdoor-ready models too, that of course cost more. You configure the network (including advanced features like guest networks) via software that runs on a computer.

Keep in mind that these are ONLY access points. You still need a router.

Visit this forum on the web at http://discuss.coworking.com


You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to [email protected].

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

Visit this forum on the web at http://discuss.coworking.com


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The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.

Join the list: http://coworkingweekly.com

Listen to the podcast: http://dangerouslyawesome.com/podcast

Another thing I like with the controller software is that you define the wireless networks there.
I decided that I needed an access point in our cafe to guarantee that we had good coverage there.

So I strung the cable mounted it in the ceiling and then “adopted” it into our existing system. No need to do anything to the AP other than I named it and set it’s fixed IP address.

It’s nice to have one place to define the wireless network configuration that will be pushed to however many access points you have. And to manage firmware upgrades centrally.

jacques

···

On Thursday, April 9, 2015 at 9:57:54 PM UTC-4, Alex Hillman wrote:

Wifi repeaters…kind of suck. You’ve gotta figure you’re taking a relatively unreliable wireless connection, trying to catch it out of the air, and then rebroadcast it. There’s SO much that can go wrong unless you have high end point-to-point gear.

It’s worth running even a single Ethernet cable to connect a switch in your new space into your existing system, and then patch new wireless access points into the switch. Even if you go on the higher end of consumer, unmanaged switches (like Netgear, ~$100), you’ll get MUCH better performance than trying to repeat wifi.

-Alex

On Thursday, April 9, 2015, Jensen Yancey [email protected] wrote:

So, we’re in the process of expanding our location (in the same building, taking over our neighbor’s space) and the wifi doesn’t quite reach to the edges of the new space, what’s the best way to get great coverage for the whole building?

Jensen

Visit this forum on the web at http://discuss.coworking.com


You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to [email protected].

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.


The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.

Join the list: http://coworkingweekly.com

Listen to the podcast: http://dangerouslyawesome.com/podcast

Hi,

I like to share my learnings about setting up WiFi for conferences. Most of this also applies to coworking spaces:

http://thilo.me/post/62067077735/the-conference-wifi-checklist

Cheers
Thilo

···


more time for you coworkers: http://cobot.me

On Sunday, April 12, 2015 at 6:53:24 AM UTC+2, Jacques Paquin wrote:

We’re opening a cowork space that’s about 14,000 sq.ft. A little large but that’s the way it worked out in the building we have. We’re using a combination of UniFi Ap and AC access points and in testing I like them. We’ll see what happens when we go live after our grand opening. So far the coworkers in there haven’t had any issues. You can run the UniFi access points without a computer controlling them, but to do some things like the captive portal you need Unifi controller software running. Since it was the only thing I needed a pc for I purchased $189 Zotac Pico pc and the controller software runs there.

On Friday, April 10, 2015 at 10:52:30 AM UTC-4, Shannon Hicks wrote:

I misspoke… The base model is 2.4Ghz only… which for internet access is plenty.

There’s no cloud app to manage it. However, typically those cloud-managed solutions (Like Cisco’s Meraki products) you not only have to buy the hardware, but you have to pay yearly fees for the software too. This is buy & you’re done.

In theory, you could set up a tiny cloud VPC to run the software… but it would need full-time VPN access into your network (and be publicly secure) for optimal results.

If this info is useful to you guys, here’s my Amazon affiliate link to the product :slight_smile:

Ubiquiti Networks UniFi AP Enterprise WiFi System UAP-3 (Pack of 3)

Shan

On Friday, April 10, 2015 at 9:30:33 AM UTC-5, Jerome wrote:

Does UniFi have a cloud app to manage these AP’s or just computer-based app?

Jerome

On Apr 10, 2015, at 7:23 AM, Shannon Hicks [email protected] wrote:

What you need are some UniFi access points. They are commercial-grade access points, similar to what a college campus, hospital, or any other facility where they need a single wifi network, but multiple access points to provide blanket coverage.

The base model, the UniFi AP, goes for like $200 for a three-pack. They are standard 2.4/5ghz Wireless N access points. They come with everything you need except the ethernet cable… It comes with the mounting base plate, brackets for drop ceilings, and the PoE injector. There are faster (WirelessAC), and outdoor-ready models too, that of course cost more. You configure the network (including advanced features like guest networks) via software that runs on a computer.

Keep in mind that these are ONLY access points. You still need a router.

Visit this forum on the web at http://discuss.coworking.com


You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

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This is a great list Thilo! Some of it doesn’t work with coworking spaces as you can’t disable Dropbox for example, but it’s still a great place to start. I’m still fine tuning our setup and it’s a constantly moving target. That is frustrating enough but I’ve seen sites with no technical expertise on the ground really struggle.

···

On Tue, Apr 14, 2015 at 6:35 AM, Thilo Utke [email protected] wrote:

Hi,

I like to share my learnings about setting up WiFi for conferences. Most of this also applies to coworking spaces:

http://thilo.me/post/62067077735/the-conference-wifi-checklist

Cheers
Thilo


more time for you coworkers: http://cobot.me

On Sunday, April 12, 2015 at 6:53:24 AM UTC+2, Jacques Paquin wrote:

We’re opening a cowork space that’s about 14,000 sq.ft. A little large but that’s the way it worked out in the building we have. We’re using a combination of UniFi Ap and AC access points and in testing I like them. We’ll see what happens when we go live after our grand opening. So far the coworkers in there haven’t had any issues. You can run the UniFi access points without a computer controlling them, but to do some things like the captive portal you need Unifi controller software running. Since it was the only thing I needed a pc for I purchased $189 Zotac Pico pc and the controller software runs there.

On Friday, April 10, 2015 at 10:52:30 AM UTC-4, Shannon Hicks wrote:

I misspoke… The base model is 2.4Ghz only… which for internet access is plenty.

There’s no cloud app to manage it. However, typically those cloud-managed solutions (Like Cisco’s Meraki products) you not only have to buy the hardware, but you have to pay yearly fees for the software too. This is buy & you’re done.

In theory, you could set up a tiny cloud VPC to run the software… but it would need full-time VPN access into your network (and be publicly secure) for optimal results.

If this info is useful to you guys, here’s my Amazon affiliate link to the product :slight_smile:

Ubiquiti Networks UniFi AP Enterprise WiFi System UAP-3 (Pack of 3)

Shan

On Friday, April 10, 2015 at 9:30:33 AM UTC-5, Jerome wrote:

Does UniFi have a cloud app to manage these AP’s or just computer-based app?

Jerome

On Apr 10, 2015, at 7:23 AM, Shannon Hicks [email protected] wrote:

What you need are some UniFi access points. They are commercial-grade access points, similar to what a college campus, hospital, or any other facility where they need a single wifi network, but multiple access points to provide blanket coverage.

The base model, the UniFi AP, goes for like $200 for a three-pack. They are standard 2.4/5ghz Wireless N access points. They come with everything you need except the ethernet cable… It comes with the mounting base plate, brackets for drop ceilings, and the PoE injector. There are faster (WirelessAC), and outdoor-ready models too, that of course cost more. You configure the network (including advanced features like guest networks) via software that runs on a computer.

Keep in mind that these are ONLY access points. You still need a router.

Visit this forum on the web at http://discuss.coworking.com


You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to [email protected].

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Visit this forum on the web at http://discuss.coworking.com


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