Determining capacity

How did you guys determine where to cap number of memberships, etc, since the building is used at different times by different people? Hope my question makes sense. :slight_smile:

It makes sense. I explain it in my book https://www.coworkinghandbook.com. I use Full Time Equivalents (FTE) depending in the access rights. Maximum capacity is a bit larger than available posts if you have flexible plans.

Ramon

Thanks, Ramon.

Anyone else have any input? I guess if I can communicate more clearly, here's what I'm trying to reason through:

We're looking to have four different tiers of access:

1) Day Pass
2) Part-Time (only needs access 3-5 days/month)
3) Full-Time (access 5 days a week, 9am-6pm)
4) Owner Status (24/7, unlimited access)

How can we determine what the cap would be on each level of access since they'll be there at different times?

For example. Let's say someone has a Part-Time membership. They CAN be there 3-5 days a month, but I don't know which days they'll be there, and I don't want to force people to indicate that as I think it would be restrictive.

So, how do we avoid overbooking?

I know some of you will probably look at this and say, "Geez! This guy is worried about overbooking and he hasn't even opened yet? Cocky much?!"

I get that. And you'd be right to feel that way ordinarily, but here's the thing -- I'm meeting with a County official today at noon to discuss our possibly receiving funding, and this is one of the things he wants to know. They want to see a very solid and well-outlined business plan and operating agreement, or they won't have anything to do with us.

So, if anyone can give me input before noon, that would rock! (Input after noon still very much appreciated!)

You are far far away from overbooking.

How many days in a month? How many days in a plan? :slight_smile:

···

On Wed, Apr 26, 2017 at 4:27 PM, Kevin Haggerty [email protected] wrote:

Thanks, Ramon.

Anyone else have any input? I guess if I can communicate more clearly, here’s what I’m trying to reason through:

We’re looking to have four different tiers of access:

  1. Day Pass

  2. Part-Time (only needs access 3-5 days/month)

  3. Full-Time (access 5 days a week, 9am-6pm)

  4. Owner Status (24/7, unlimited access)

How can we determine what the cap would be on each level of access since they’ll be there at different times?

For example. Let’s say someone has a Part-Time membership. They CAN be there 3-5 days a month, but I don’t know which days they’ll be there, and I don’t want to force people to indicate that as I think it would be restrictive.

So, how do we avoid overbooking?

I know some of you will probably look at this and say, “Geez! This guy is worried about overbooking and he hasn’t even opened yet? Cocky much?!”

I get that. And you’d be right to feel that way ordinarily, but here’s the thing – I’m meeting with a County official today at noon to discuss our possibly receiving funding, and this is one of the things he wants to know. They want to see a very solid and well-outlined business plan and operating agreement, or they won’t have anything to do with us.

So, if anyone can give me input before noon, that would rock! (Input after noon still very much appreciated!)

Visit this forum on the web at http://discuss.coworking.com


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Ramon Suarez / Serendipity Accelerator
[email protected] / +3227376769 / +32497556284 / skype: ramonsuarez

Betacowork Coworking Brussels
http://www.betacowork.com
4 Rue de peres blancs. 1040, Etterbeek, Brussels, Belgium

Do you want to open your own coworking space? http://www.betacowork.com/open-betacowork-coworking-space-us/

Yes, we agree on that point. :slight_smile:

However, the people who I'm talking to about funding want to know what my plan is for when I'm NOT far, far away from overbooking, and they also want to know what metrics I'll be using to determine when I'm close to that point. I was certain most of you have faced this, and so was hoping for input in relation to your experiences. Thanks! :slight_smile:

I once read that 100 sq ft per person is the norm for coworking spaces, and then you can multiply that up to 4 for a total membership cap (since not everyone will be there at all times). So, 5000 sq feet = 50 member capacity x 4 = 200 member cap.

Jen

···

On Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at 8:50:08 PM UTC-5, Kevin Haggerty wrote:

How did you guys determine where to cap number of memberships, etc, since the building is used at different times by different people? Hope my question makes sense. :slight_smile:

Thank you, Jen. This was very helpful. :slight_smile:

Jen's numbers are pretty close - 100sf per person (that's counts for all common areas, too) is a decent rule of thumb. The 4-to-1 ratio only works on flex desks though, so that final count isn't quite right.

I generally recommend staying between 40-60% full time desks, and keeping the rest flex, to avoid territorialism and maximize the serendipity/collision potential that everyone raves about with coworking.

So 5000 sq ft would could be 50 spots, and if you did an even split of full and flex (you'd have a estimated membership capacity of 25 + (25*4), or 125. For a 5000 square foot space, this is a much more realistic number before you start running into issues or ever needing to worry about overbooking.

With all of that math said, two caveats:
this calculation depends SO heavily on everything from the kinds of members in your community, the other work environments they have access to/use already, and even the seasons and weather.

The OTHER thing, and this is the most important, is that knowing what I know now I would actively try to avoid tying membership capacity to square footage. Yes, the workspace has finite resources but the COMMUNITY can exist (and thrive) beyond the walls of the space. 60%+ of our members almost never use the space, but get value from membership through events and online community interactions.

Honestly, we had this baked into our founding community and it kinda fell off a few years in, but once we started focusing on it again it's been the biggest aspect of our growth. People join before they need a desk to have a supportive community as they figure out their next professional move, and people keep memberships after job changes and physical relocations where they don't need a desk, but still have ways to belong and contribute.

So get the numbers as a baseline, and make sure they add up. Then look for ways to grow membership that aren't tied to square footage. That's where the growth and resiliency is!

-Alex

···

On Apr 27, 2017, 9:30 AM -0400, Kevin Haggerty <[email protected]>, wrote:

Thank you, Jen. This was very helpful. :slight_smile:

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While we're on the subject, is there a guideline for private office
size (i.e. offices that are permanently rented out to members on a
monthly or even yearly basis)? I was originally thinking 10'x10',
which fits into the 100sf rule. But maybe it's different when you've
got four walls to define "your" space?

Jen

···

On Thu, Apr 27, 2017 at 8:48 AM, Alex Hillman <[email protected]> wrote:

Jen's numbers are pretty close - 100sf per person (that's counts for all
common areas, too) is a decent rule of thumb. The 4-to-1 ratio only works on
flex desks though, so that final count isn't quite right.

I generally recommend staying between 40-60% full time desks, and keeping
the rest flex, to avoid territorialism and maximize the
serendipity/collision potential that everyone raves about with coworking.

So 5000 sq ft would could be 50 spots, and if you did an even split of full
and flex (you'd have a estimated membership capacity of 25 + (25*4), or 125.
For a 5000 square foot space, this is a much more realistic number before
you start running into issues or ever needing to worry about overbooking.

With all of that math said, two caveats:
this calculation depends SO heavily on everything from the kinds of members
in your community, the other work environments they have access to/use
already, and even the seasons and weather.

The OTHER thing, and this is the most important, is that knowing what I know
now I would actively try to avoid tying membership capacity to square
footage. Yes, the workspace has finite resources but the COMMUNITY can exist
(and thrive) beyond the walls of the space. 60%+ of our members almost never
use the space, but get value from membership through events and online
community interactions.

Honestly, we had this baked into our founding community and it kinda fell
off a few years in, but once we started focusing on it again it's been the
biggest aspect of our growth. People join before they need a desk to have a
supportive community as they figure out their next professional move, and
people keep memberships after job changes and physical relocations where
they don't need a desk, but still have ways to belong and contribute.

So get the numbers as a baseline, and make sure they add up. Then look for
ways to grow membership that aren't tied to square footage. That's where the
growth and resiliency is!

-Alex

On Apr 27, 2017, 9:30 AM -0400, Kevin Haggerty <[email protected]>, > wrote:

Thank you, Jen. This was very helpful. :slight_smile:

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--------------------------------
Jennifer Dunham Luby
[email protected]
c: 847.207.0358

First, here’s a 50% off coupon for anything in my store. I can’t recommend the cash flow for year 1 enough to you. It will illuminate so many things for you. http://coherecommunity.com/the-goods code: pleasehelpme
It gives you realistic membership projections for a variety of membership options as well as lines for each and every expense you could ever imagine having to pay for.

Next, capacity is hard. I have 10 desks in 288 ft2 (28 ft2 per person) where we comfortably cowork so that kind of blows the 100 ft2 thing out of the water.

The simplest calculation is to Multiply how many desks you have times 5 (days/week). That gives you the TOTAL number of days you can sell per week. So for 10 desks x 5 days you have 50 days per week to sell. Let’s say you get 10 people who want full time memberships. That’s your capacity. If they’re all flex desks you can start to play around with overselling memberships like a gym. Maybe you can handle 13 full time members at 10 desks b/c I have never found a member that uses 100% of a full time membership.

Other numbers:

We have 58 members right now in a total of 2,500 ft2 (48 ft2/person). Half of those members are in 7 private offices, which probably take 40% of my total square footage. The other 26 members are all sharing the 10 desks upstairs in addition to 7 other places (closets turned into workspaces, chairs on stair landings, patio, living room and kitchen) they can work throughout the building so I could cram 17 flex deskers in here at any given moment but I keep my number around 10-11 per day. Cohere’s members are highly engaged and tend to use most of their membership allowance which drives down how much I can oversell memberships.

···

On Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at 7:50:08 PM UTC-6, Kevin Haggerty wrote:

How did you guys determine where to cap number of memberships, etc, since the building is used at different times by different people? Hope my question makes sense. :slight_smile:

Alex,

Thank you! This is hugely helpful too!

Totally hear you on adding value beyond the space. I've recently begun to talk to another local entrepreneur who had previously been interested in starting a local small business incubator. A mutual friend of ours (who acts as a mentor for us both) put us in contact with each other a few days ago, and we really hit it off. Turns out, we both had a similar vision, which was to help small businesses and entrepreneurs in Gloucester, VA to be successful -- we just were pursuing it in different ways.

Moreover, we both felt (and feel) that our different strengths and connections complement the others', and it just seemed like it made more sense to collaborate than to compete against each other with such similar ideas and visions.

So, we decided that we are going to partner together to create what will be a coworking space that also happens to be a small business incubator. We're working to establish an advisory of local businesspeople who would essentially act as mentors. The mentors all would come from diverse fields (local business owners, accountants, lawyers, marketers, and various other consultants who will bring value), and they'd be asked to donate an hour a month of consulting/advising for the members. The advisors will also
be asked / have the opportunity to lead classes and workshops which will give them opportunity to pour into the members, but also to advertise their services, so it's reciprocal value, hopefully.

We know that the incubator aspect will not appeal to all, but that is true of the coffee, the printer, the meeting room, and even the coworking space to an extent, right? :slight_smile:

Thanks, Angel!

Yes yes yes - look at Angel’s numbers.

I also really love the “total number of people/days you can sell per week” model. It’s absolutely the most realistic. Also, in practice, we’ve learned that it’s valuable to track the number of unused desks on a daily basis (even if it’s a rough count) so you know how often (and on which days) you get close to capacity. This it gives you a number where worst case scenario is that you start a waiting list for higher-usage levels of membership. We often have a waiting list for full time spots, and occasionally put a temporary waiting list on our 3 day a week plans to make sure that we’re not oversold to the point where someone might not have a desk.

I have 10 desks in 288 ft2 (28 ft2 per person) where we comfortably cowork so that kind of blows the 100 ft2 thing out of the water.

Just to clarify this - it sounds like dense areas of desks are also balanced with common areas (patio, living room, kitchen, etc), right? I only recommend the 100 ft2 thing as a starting point because it’s doable. And if you can achieve more density and be comfortable, your numbers are only going to improve. I always try to estimate on the conservative side vs the optimal side.

Like I said - conservative guidelines. :wink: We’ve also packed people in and made it work! he thing to remember is that not all square feet are equal…our most recent move was only ~10% more linear square feet, but we were able to increase capacity by over 30% because of the way the room ways shaped.

Looking back at our numbers, our original space maxed out at 26 desks sharing ~1800 square feet (including common areas like a kitchen, lounge, and single meeting room), so not far off from Angel’s numbers. That was cozy…and worked great. I think we had ~70 members when we had readily outgrown it, and when our waiting list kept growing we decided to look at new options.

There’s a zillion ways to fit desks into different shaped rooms. I’m blown away how many ways we’ve rearranged little rectangles inside of bigger rectangles. It seems like there’s always a better way we haven’t tried yet.

···

On Thu, Apr 27, 2017 at 11:04 AM, Angel Kwiatkowski [email protected] wrote:

First, here’s a 50% off coupon for anything in my store. I can’t recommend the cash flow for year 1 enough to you. It will illuminate so many things for you. http://coherecommunity.com/the-goods code: pleasehelpme
It gives you realistic membership projections for a variety of membership options as well as lines for each and every expense you could ever imagine having to pay for.

Next, capacity is hard. I have 10 desks in 288 ft2 (28 ft2 per person) where we comfortably cowork so that kind of blows the 100 ft2 thing out of the water.

The simplest calculation is to Multiply how many desks you have times 5 (days/week). That gives you the TOTAL number of days you can sell per week. So for 10 desks x 5 days you have 50 days per week to sell. Let’s say you get 10 people who want full time memberships. That’s your capacity. If they’re all flex desks you can start to play around with overselling memberships like a gym. Maybe you can handle 13 full time members at 10 desks b/c I have never found a member that uses 100% of a full time membership.

Other numbers:

We have 58 members right now in a total of 2,500 ft2 (48 ft2/person). Half of those members are in 7 private offices, which probably take 40% of my total square footage. The other 26 members are all sharing the 10 desks upstairs in addition to 7 other places (closets turned into workspaces, chairs on stair landings, patio, living room and kitchen) they can work throughout the building so I could cram 17 flex deskers in here at any given moment but I keep my number around 10-11 per day. Cohere’s members are highly engaged and tend to use most of their membership allowance which drives down how much I can oversell memberships.

On Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at 7:50:08 PM UTC-6, Kevin Haggerty wrote:

How did you guys determine where to cap number of memberships, etc, since the building is used at different times by different people? Hope my question makes sense. :slight_smile:

Visit this forum on the web at http://discuss.coworking.com


You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to [email protected].

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The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.

Better Coworkers: http://indyhall.org

Weekly Coworking Tips: http://coworkingweekly.com

My Audiobook: https://theindyhallway.com/ten

Our smallest office is 8x11 ft and rents for $425/month, our largest office is $208 ft2 and sells for $700/month but it’s in the basement with only 1 little window.

Aside from size, anything can be worked as a private office as long as it has a door, adding exterior windows seems to be the thing that drives up price and therefore profitability. You just want to make sure that you can get at least 40% more for the square footage of an office than what you pay in rent.

Angel

···

On Thursday, April 27, 2017 at 9:16:08 AM UTC-6, Jen Luby wrote:

While we’re on the subject, is there a guideline for private office

size (i.e. offices that are permanently rented out to members on a

monthly or even yearly basis)? I was originally thinking 10’x10’,

which fits into the 100sf rule. But maybe it’s different when you’ve

got four walls to define “your” space?

Jen

On Thu, Apr 27, 2017 at 8:48 AM, Alex Hillman > > [email protected] wrote:

Jen’s numbers are pretty close - 100sf per person (that’s counts for all

common areas, too) is a decent rule of thumb. The 4-to-1 ratio only works on

flex desks though, so that final count isn’t quite right.

I generally recommend staying between 40-60% full time desks, and keeping

the rest flex, to avoid territorialism and maximize the

serendipity/collision potential that everyone raves about with coworking.

So 5000 sq ft would could be 50 spots, and if you did an even split of full

and flex (you’d have a estimated membership capacity of 25 + (25*4), or 125.

For a 5000 square foot space, this is a much more realistic number before

you start running into issues or ever needing to worry about overbooking.

With all of that math said, two caveats:

this calculation depends SO heavily on everything from the kinds of members

in your community, the other work environments they have access to/use

already, and even the seasons and weather.

The OTHER thing, and this is the most important, is that knowing what I know

now I would actively try to avoid tying membership capacity to square

footage. Yes, the workspace has finite resources but the COMMUNITY can exist

(and thrive) beyond the walls of the space. 60%+ of our members almost never

use the space, but get value from membership through events and online

community interactions.

Honestly, we had this baked into our founding community and it kinda fell

off a few years in, but once we started focusing on it again it’s been the

biggest aspect of our growth. People join before they need a desk to have a

supportive community as they figure out their next professional move, and

people keep memberships after job changes and physical relocations where

they don’t need a desk, but still have ways to belong and contribute.

So get the numbers as a baseline, and make sure they add up. Then look for

ways to grow membership that aren’t tied to square footage. That’s where the

growth and resiliency is!

-Alex

On Apr 27, 2017, 9:30 AM -0400, Kevin Haggerty [email protected], > > > wrote:

Thank you, Jen. This was very helpful. :slight_smile:

Visit this forum on the web at http://discuss.coworking.com


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Jennifer Dunham Luby

[email protected]

c: 847.207.0358

Correct, you claim 28ft2 as your work area but can then wander another 1,200ft2 of common areas throughout the day. Those number are super estimated as I’ve never measured the footage of our hallways, kitchen or patio.

···

On Thursday, April 27, 2017 at 9:34:01 AM UTC-6, Alex Hillman wrote:

Yes yes yes - look at Angel’s numbers.

I also really love the “total number of people/days you can sell per week” model. It’s absolutely the most realistic. Also, in practice, we’ve learned that it’s valuable to track the number of unused desks on a daily basis (even if it’s a rough count) so you know how often (and on which days) you get close to capacity. This it gives you a number where worst case scenario is that you start a waiting list for higher-usage levels of membership. We often have a waiting list for full time spots, and occasionally put a temporary waiting list on our 3 day a week plans to make sure that we’re not oversold to the point where someone might not have a desk.

I have 10 desks in 288 ft2 (28 ft2 per person) where we comfortably cowork so that kind of blows the 100 ft2 thing out of the water.

Just to clarify this - it sounds like dense areas of desks are also balanced with common areas (patio, living room, kitchen, etc), right? I only recommend the 100 ft2 thing as a starting point because it’s doable. And if you can achieve more density and be comfortable, your numbers are only going to improve. I always try to estimate on the conservative side vs the optimal side.

Like I said - conservative guidelines. :wink: We’ve also packed people in and made it work! he thing to remember is that not all square feet are equal…our most recent move was only ~10% more linear square feet, but we were able to increase capacity by over 30% because of the way the room ways shaped.

Looking back at our numbers, our original space maxed out at 26 desks sharing ~1800 square feet (including common areas like a kitchen, lounge, and single meeting room), so not far off from Angel’s numbers. That was cozy…and worked great. I think we had ~70 members when we had readily outgrown it, and when our waiting list kept growing we decided to look at new options.

There’s a zillion ways to fit desks into different shaped rooms. I’m blown away how many ways we’ve rearranged little rectangles inside of bigger rectangles. It seems like there’s always a better way we haven’t tried yet.


The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.

Better Coworkers: http://indyhall.org

Weekly Coworking Tips: http://coworkingweekly.com

My Audiobook: https://theindyhallway.com/ten

On Thu, Apr 27, 2017 at 11:04 AM, Angel Kwiatkowski [email protected] wrote:

First, here’s a 50% off coupon for anything in my store. I can’t recommend the cash flow for year 1 enough to you. It will illuminate so many things for you. http://coherecommunity.com/the-goods code: pleasehelpme
It gives you realistic membership projections for a variety of membership options as well as lines for each and every expense you could ever imagine having to pay for.

Next, capacity is hard. I have 10 desks in 288 ft2 (28 ft2 per person) where we comfortably cowork so that kind of blows the 100 ft2 thing out of the water.

The simplest calculation is to Multiply how many desks you have times 5 (days/week). That gives you the TOTAL number of days you can sell per week. So for 10 desks x 5 days you have 50 days per week to sell. Let’s say you get 10 people who want full time memberships. That’s your capacity. If they’re all flex desks you can start to play around with overselling memberships like a gym. Maybe you can handle 13 full time members at 10 desks b/c I have never found a member that uses 100% of a full time membership.

Other numbers:

We have 58 members right now in a total of 2,500 ft2 (48 ft2/person). Half of those members are in 7 private offices, which probably take 40% of my total square footage. The other 26 members are all sharing the 10 desks upstairs in addition to 7 other places (closets turned into workspaces, chairs on stair landings, patio, living room and kitchen) they can work throughout the building so I could cram 17 flex deskers in here at any given moment but I keep my number around 10-11 per day. Cohere’s members are highly engaged and tend to use most of their membership allowance which drives down how much I can oversell memberships.

On Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at 7:50:08 PM UTC-6, Kevin Haggerty wrote:

How did you guys determine where to cap number of memberships, etc, since the building is used at different times by different people? Hope my question makes sense. :slight_smile:

Visit this forum on the web at http://discuss.coworking.com


You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to [email protected].

For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

I’d like to add that square footage calculations can vary and mislead. For example, some markets list, say, 5000 “rentable sf” but that might include a proportional share of common areas in the overall building. Others list 5000sf plus a load factor, say, 30%.

···

Focus on usable or net square footage. That’s the space most would consider as “their space”, without hidden HVAC shafts, cavity space, etc.

FYI, gross sf is slightly misleading, up to 5-10% off because they include wall thicknesses that you can’t occupy.

Jerome, architect

www.BLANKSPACES.com

On Apr 27, 2017, at 8:40 AM, Angel Kwiatkowski [email protected] wrote:

Correct, you claim 28ft2 as your work area but can then wander another 1,200ft2 of common areas throughout the day. Those number are super estimated as I’ve never measured the footage of our hallways, kitchen or patio.

On Thursday, April 27, 2017 at 9:34:01 AM UTC-6, Alex Hillman wrote:

Yes yes yes - look at Angel’s numbers.

I also really love the “total number of people/days you can sell per week” model. It’s absolutely the most realistic. Also, in practice, we’ve learned that it’s valuable to track the number of unused desks on a daily basis (even if it’s a rough count) so you know how often (and on which days) you get close to capacity. This it gives you a number where worst case scenario is that you start a waiting list for higher-usage levels of membership. We often have a waiting list for full time spots, and occasionally put a temporary waiting list on our 3 day a week plans to make sure that we’re not oversold to the point where someone might not have a desk.

I have 10 desks in 288 ft2 (28 ft2 per person) where we comfortably cowork so that kind of blows the 100 ft2 thing out of the water.

Just to clarify this - it sounds like dense areas of desks are also balanced with common areas (patio, living room, kitchen, etc), right? I only recommend the 100 ft2 thing as a starting point because it’s doable. And if you can achieve more density and be comfortable, your numbers are only going to improve. I always try to estimate on the conservative side vs the optimal side.

Like I said - conservative guidelines. :wink: We’ve also packed people in and made it work! he thing to remember is that not all square feet are equal…our most recent move was only ~10% more linear square feet, but we were able to increase capacity by over 30% because of the way the room ways shaped.

Looking back at our numbers, our original space maxed out at 26 desks sharing ~1800 square feet (including common areas like a kitchen, lounge, and single meeting room), so not far off from Angel’s numbers. That was cozy…and worked great. I think we had ~70 members when we had readily outgrown it, and when our waiting list kept growing we decided to look at new options.

There’s a zillion ways to fit desks into different shaped rooms. I’m blown away how many ways we’ve rearranged little rectangles inside of bigger rectangles. It seems like there’s always a better way we haven’t tried yet.


The #1 mistake in community building is doing it by yourself.

Better Coworkers: http://indyhall.org

Weekly Coworking Tips: http://coworkingweekly.com

My Audiobook: https://theindyhallway.com/ten

On Thu, Apr 27, 2017 at 11:04 AM, Angel Kwiatkowski [email protected] wrote:

First, here’s a 50% off coupon for anything in my store. I can’t recommend the cash flow for year 1 enough to you. It will illuminate so many things for you. http://coherecommunity.com/the-goods code: pleasehelpme
It gives you realistic membership projections for a variety of membership options as well as lines for each and every expense you could ever imagine having to pay for.

Next, capacity is hard. I have 10 desks in 288 ft2 (28 ft2 per person) where we comfortably cowork so that kind of blows the 100 ft2 thing out of the water.

The simplest calculation is to Multiply how many desks you have times 5 (days/week). That gives you the TOTAL number of days you can sell per week. So for 10 desks x 5 days you have 50 days per week to sell. Let’s say you get 10 people who want full time memberships. That’s your capacity. If they’re all flex desks you can start to play around with overselling memberships like a gym. Maybe you can handle 13 full time members at 10 desks b/c I have never found a member that uses 100% of a full time membership.

Other numbers:

We have 58 members right now in a total of 2,500 ft2 (48 ft2/person). Half of those members are in 7 private offices, which probably take 40% of my total square footage. The other 26 members are all sharing the 10 desks upstairs in addition to 7 other places (closets turned into workspaces, chairs on stair landings, patio, living room and kitchen) they can work throughout the building so I could cram 17 flex deskers in here at any given moment but I keep my number around 10-11 per day. Cohere’s members are highly engaged and tend to use most of their membership allowance which drives down how much I can oversell memberships.

On Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at 7:50:08 PM UTC-6, Kevin Haggerty wrote:

How did you guys determine where to cap number of memberships, etc, since the building is used at different times by different people? Hope my question makes sense. :slight_smile:

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I'm hugely appreciative of all who have weighed in. I know you are all very busy, so it means a lot to me.

Angel: I went ahead and picked up your cashflow spreadsheet. I can read through it while I'm listening to Alex's audiobook! :slight_smile:

YES!!! It will be very helpful as you sort through a range of ways to make and spend money!!

Angel

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On Thursday, April 27, 2017 at 12:54:24 PM UTC-6, Kevin Haggerty wrote:

I’m hugely appreciative of all who have weighed in. I know you are all very busy, so it means a lot to me.
Angel: I went ahead and picked up your cashflow spreadsheet. I can read through it while I’m listening to Alex’s audiobook! :slight_smile: