Customers asking for discount or "gracious price" or free on space rental for events

Hi everyone,

My name is Joanne and I am a new owner of a women coworking space in Switzerland. I just opened my space on Monday - 28th May. As I have gotten a space which is spacious and full of charms, I have several requests from people asking to rent the space to host workshops and events. The problem is, people are always asking for discounts or gracious pricing. Their reasoning is that my space is really new and they would be doing me a favour by bring people to my space and in return I should be charging at a really low price or free.

I am hesitant on this idea of extreme discount as at the end of the day, I still have bills to pay.

What is your advice on this?

Thank you in advance!

Joanne

Don’t do it. Once you lower your prices, it’s impossible to raise them again. Determine your costs as best you can, research what others charge and stick with it. Events and meetings will not bring you future business, only more events at prices you can’t afford.

If any money you receive from events are over and above the revenue you based your business model on, then the first question you ask yourself is whether you want or need the events? Keep in mind that events can hurt your business if they are disruptive to your members, which they are in must cases.

···

On May 30, 2018, at 8:01 AM, Joanne Gerussi [email protected] wrote:

Hi everyone,

My name is Joanne and I am a new owner of a women coworking space in Switzerland. I just opened my space on Monday - 28th May. As I have gotten a space which is spacious and full of charms, I have several requests from people asking to rent the space to host workshops and events. The problem is, people are always asking for discounts or gracious pricing. Their reasoning is that my space is really new and they would be doing me a favour by bring people to my space and in return I should be charging at a really low price or free.

I am hesitant on this idea of extreme discount as at the end of the day, I still have bills to pay.

What is your advice on this?

Thank you in advance!

Joanne

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Everything Pat said.

You reap what you sow. Hosting other people's events in your space is a very weak, slow lead generator.

We have strategically given away space to people we proactively wanted to do things with: eg supporting an existing members' new meetup, or doing a special crossover event with a community we want to collaborate with.

But when the demand is inbound, people will always be looking for a deal. That's just business. Hold firm on your value.

And depending on your town or city, I recommend having a few places that are low cost or free that you can recommend them to. That way you don't have to turn them away empty handed and can still help them without devaluing yourself.

Alex

···

On May 30, 2018, 9:22 AM -0400, Pat Manley <[email protected]>, wrote:

Don’t do it. Once you lower your prices, it’s impossible to raise them again. Determine your costs as best you can, research what others charge and stick with it. Events and meetings will not bring you future business, only more events at prices you can’t afford.

If any money you receive from events are over and above the revenue you based your business model on, then the first question you ask yourself is whether you want or need the events? Keep in mind that events can hurt your business if they are disruptive to your members, which they are in must cases.

--
Patrick W. Manley, RA, AIAA, ALA
Manley Architecture Group/MAG
3820 North High Street Columbus, Ohio 43214
Ph: (614) 545-1147
Cell: (614) 496-9096
Association of Licensed Architects (ALA)
www.manleyarchitects.us
Past President, Ohio Chapter of the Association of Licensed Architects and ALA National Board of Directors

On May 30, 2018, at 8:01 AM, Joanne Gerussi <[email protected]> wrote:

Hi everyone,

My name is Joanne and I am a new owner of a women coworking space in Switzerland. I just opened my space on Monday - 28th May. As I have gotten a space which is spacious and full of charms, I have several requests from people asking to rent the space to host workshops and events. The problem is, people are always asking for discounts or gracious pricing. Their reasoning is that my space is really new and they would be doing me a favour by bring people to my space and in return I should be charging at a really low price or free.

I am hesitant on this idea of extreme discount as at the end of the day, I still have bills to pay.

What is your advice on this?

Thank you in advance!
Joanne
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Thank you, Patrick. That’s how I feel too. As I am new to this, I was a bit lost on how I should respond to these requests. Now I know.

···

On Wednesday, 30 May 2018 15:22:54 UTC+2, Pat Manley wrote:

Don’t do it. Once you lower your prices, it’s impossible to raise them again. Determine your costs as best you can, research what others charge and stick with it. Events and meetings will not bring you future business, only more events at prices you can’t afford.

If any money you receive from events are over and above the revenue you based your business model on, then the first question you ask yourself is whether you want or need the events? Keep in mind that events can hurt your business if they are disruptive to your members, which they are in must cases.


Patrick W. Manley, RA, AIAA, ALA
Manley Architecture Group/MAG
3820 North High Street Columbus, Ohio 43214
Ph: (614) 545-1147
Cell: (614) 496-9096
Association of Licensed Architects (ALA)
www.manleyarchitects.us
Past President, Ohio Chapter of the Association of Licensed Architects and ALA National Board of Directors

On May 30, 2018, at 8:01 AM, Joanne Gerussi [email protected] wrote:

Hi everyone,

My name is Joanne and I am a new owner of a women coworking space in Switzerland. I just opened my space on Monday - 28th May. As I have gotten a space which is spacious and full of charms, I have several requests from people asking to rent the space to host workshops and events. The problem is, people are always asking for discounts or gracious pricing. Their reasoning is that my space is really new and they would be doing me a favour by bring people to my space and in return I should be charging at a really low price or free.

I am hesitant on this idea of extreme discount as at the end of the day, I still have bills to pay.

What is your advice on this?

Thank you in advance!

Joanne

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Hi Alex. Thank you for you advice. Really appreciate it. As I am new to
this coworking scene, I am afraid that I would not be able to get people to
be a member at my space. A part of me wanted to resort to accepting events
and workshops to bring in some income. But I guess I should concentrate on
networking and getting my space noticed.

Thank you once again!

···

On Wednesday, 30 May 2018 15:29:29 UTC+2, Alex Hillman wrote:

Everything Pat said.

You reap what you sow. Hosting other people's events in your space is a
very weak, slow lead generator.

We have strategically given away space to people we *proactively* wanted
to do things with: eg supporting an existing members' new meetup, or doing
a special crossover event with a community we want to collaborate with.

But when the demand is inbound, people will always be looking for a deal.
That's just business. Hold firm on your value.

And depending on your town or city, I recommend having a few places that
are low cost or free that you can recommend them to. That way you don't
have to turn them away empty handed and can still help them without
devaluing yourself.

Alex

On May 30, 2018, 9:22 AM -0400, Pat Manley <[email protected] > <javascript:>>, wrote:

Don’t do it. Once you lower your prices, it’s impossible to raise them
again. Determine your costs as best you can, research what others charge
and stick with it. Events and meetings will not bring you future business,
only more events at prices you can’t afford.

If any money you receive from events are over and above the revenue you
based your business model on, then the first question you ask yourself is
whether you want or need the events? Keep in mind that events can hurt your
business if they are disruptive to your members, which they are in must
cases.

--
Patrick W. Manley, RA, AIAA, ALA
Manley Architecture Group/MAG
3820 North High Street Columbus, Ohio 43214
Ph: (614) 545-1147
Cell: (614) 496-9096
Association of Licensed Architects (ALA)
www.manleyarchitects.us
Past President, Ohio Chapter of the Association of Licensed Architects and
ALA National Board of Directors

On May 30, 2018, at 8:01 AM, Joanne Gerussi <[email protected] > <javascript:>> wrote:

Hi everyone,

My name is Joanne and I am a new owner of a women coworking space in
Switzerland. I just opened my space on Monday - 28th May. As I have gotten
a space which is spacious and full of charms, I have several requests from
people asking to rent the space to host workshops and events. The problem
is, people are always asking for discounts or gracious pricing. Their
reasoning is that my space is really new and they would be doing me a
favour by bring people to my space and in return I should be charging at a
really low price or free.

I am hesitant on this idea of extreme discount as at the end of the day, I
still have bills to pay.

What is your advice on this?

Thank you in advance!
Joanne

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Joanne,

I’m new to the co-working business as I just started one this month. However, I own several businesses and leased space in one of my buildings to a co-working group for about four years, so I’ve learned a enough to be dangerous. Lol.

One thing I’ve learned the hard way over the years is sometimes you have more success by saying ‘no’. It doesn’t mean you don’t entertain opportunities, but when in doubt, ‘no’ is the business equivalent of an investor protecting his or her principal.

You were smart to ask for advice. Always a good thing to do when unsure.

Pat

···

On May 30, 2018, at 10:12 AM, Joanne Gerussi [email protected] wrote:

Thank you, Patrick. That’s how I feel too. As I am new to this, I was a bit lost on how I should respond to these requests. Now I know.

On Wednesday, 30 May 2018 15:22:54 UTC+2, Pat Manley wrote:

Don’t do it. Once you lower your prices, it’s impossible to raise them again. Determine your costs as best you can, research what others charge and stick with it. Events and meetings will not bring you future business, only more events at prices you can’t afford.

If any money you receive from events are over and above the revenue you based your business model on, then the first question you ask yourself is whether you want or need the events? Keep in mind that events can hurt your business if they are disruptive to your members, which they are in must cases.


Patrick W. Manley, RA, AIAA, ALA
Manley Architecture Group/MAG
3820 North High Street Columbus, Ohio 43214
Ph: (614) 545-1147
Cell: (614) 496-9096
Association of Licensed Architects (ALA)
www.manleyarchitects.us
Past President, Ohio Chapter of the Association of Licensed Architects and ALA National Board of Directors

On May 30, 2018, at 8:01 AM, Joanne Gerussi [email protected] wrote:

Hi everyone,

My name is Joanne and I am a new owner of a women coworking space in Switzerland. I just opened my space on Monday - 28th May. As I have gotten a space which is spacious and full of charms, I have several requests from people asking to rent the space to host workshops and events. The problem is, people are always asking for discounts or gracious pricing. Their reasoning is that my space is really new and they would be doing me a favour by bring people to my space and in return I should be charging at a really low price or free.

I am hesitant on this idea of extreme discount as at the end of the day, I still have bills to pay.

What is your advice on this?

Thank you in advance!

Joanne

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What Patrick and Alex said. It’s the phrase freelancers hear all the time - “Do this for $xxx discount, it’ll be good exposure for you.” We have over 240 non-profits registered in our zip code, so the variation we hear is “Can’t you give us a discount, we’re a non-profit?” I explain that our prices and amenities are already priced to be affordable by everyone. Sometimes I’ll add that we’re not a non-profit that accepts donations, so we have to price as we do if we’re going to be sustainable.

The other plea we hear, and I’m sure you will too, is “give us a discount now and there will be repeat business.” I flip that around and let them know these are our rates, but we appreciate repeat business and can discuss a discount on those later bookings.

As one acquaintance said, after dropping his “we’re a non-profit” pitch on me and I told him I knew what that really meant, and it doesn’t mean they don’t have any money, he was honest and told me “I always ask because sometimes it works”. You shouldn’t stress over it or feel guilty. In the end, it’s just business and everyone wants to spend as little as they have to.

If you want to show a little flexibility, consider the other freelancer adage: never lower your price, increase your value. You can offer some small amenity (coffee, free use of a projector, etc) so they feel like they’ve “won”.

Glen Ferguson

Phone: 301-732-5165

Email: [email protected]

Website: https://www.coworkfrederick.com

Address: 122 E Patrick St, Frederick, MD 21701

···

On Wed, May 30, 2018 at 10:12 AM, Joanne Gerussi [email protected] wrote:

Thank you, Patrick. That’s how I feel too. As I am new to this, I was a bit lost on how I should respond to these requests. Now I know.

On Wednesday, 30 May 2018 15:22:54 UTC+2, Pat Manley wrote:

Don’t do it. Once you lower your prices, it’s impossible to raise them again. Determine your costs as best you can, research what others charge and stick with it. Events and meetings will not bring you future business, only more events at prices you can’t afford.

If any money you receive from events are over and above the revenue you based your business model on, then the first question you ask yourself is whether you want or need the events? Keep in mind that events can hurt your business if they are disruptive to your members, which they are in must cases.


Patrick W. Manley, RA, AIAA, ALA
Manley Architecture Group/MAG
3820 North High Street Columbus, Ohio 43214
[Ph: ](https://maps.google.com/?q=3820+North+High+Street+Columbus,+Ohio+43214+Ph:+    +(614&entry=gmail&source=g)(614) 545-1147
Cell: (614) 496-9096
Association of Licensed Architects (ALA)
www.manleyarchitects.us
Past President, Ohio Chapter of the Association of Licensed Architects and ALA National Board of Directors

On May 30, 2018, at 8:01 AM, Joanne Gerussi [email protected] wrote:

Hi everyone,

My name is Joanne and I am a new owner of a women coworking space in Switzerland. I just opened my space on Monday - 28th May. As I have gotten a space which is spacious and full of charms, I have several requests from people asking to rent the space to host workshops and events. The problem is, people are always asking for discounts or gracious pricing. Their reasoning is that my space is really new and they would be doing me a favour by bring people to my space and in return I should be charging at a really low price or free.

I am hesitant on this idea of extreme discount as at the end of the day, I still have bills to pay.

What is your advice on this?

Thank you in advance!

Joanne

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Hey Joanne,

I encountered a similar challenge in the space I ran once. I realized that this could be turned into an opportunity if looked at from the right perspective.

In our case, we created a program that allowed group organizers to apply for access to our event space, in exchange for offering thanks to any sponsors we could secure to underwrite the cost of hosting them.

We had a bunch of really great, well-established local groups apply.

We then packaged up those groups and presented them to sponsors, who were attracted to the idea of being able to reach a lot of people while only having to forge one deal. We did the work of curating so it was easy for them to say yes.

Everybody won—sponsors got exposure, organizers got venues without having to pay cash, and we got the money we needed to support the program (and the increased awareness of having lots of people come through our space for events).

I help my clients develop similar programs when this comes up, so I know it can be reproduced.

If you’re interested in putting in the effort, perhaps you can implement something similar.

**At the very least, creating a container for receiving people who want to host events in your space helps alleviate the stress. **

**Even if you don’t do the sponsor model above, creating quarterly or twice-a-year application periods for events gives you an easy construct to point people to so it isn’t a big back-and-forth. **

I would highly recommend that to most everyone here if they encounter a similar situation as described in this thread.

Cheers!
Tony Bacigalupo

···

On Wed, May 30, 2018 at 10:42 AM, Glen Ferguson [email protected] wrote:

What Patrick and Alex said. It’s the phrase freelancers hear all the time - “Do this for $xxx discount, it’ll be good exposure for you.” We have over 240 non-profits registered in our zip code, so the variation we hear is “Can’t you give us a discount, we’re a non-profit?” I explain that our prices and amenities are already priced to be affordable by everyone. Sometimes I’ll add that we’re not a non-profit that accepts donations, so we have to price as we do if we’re going to be sustainable.

The other plea we hear, and I’m sure you will too, is “give us a discount now and there will be repeat business.” I flip that around and let them know these are our rates, but we appreciate repeat business and can discuss a discount on those later bookings.

As one acquaintance said, after dropping his “we’re a non-profit” pitch on me and I told him I knew what that really meant, and it doesn’t mean they don’t have any money, he was honest and told me “I always ask because sometimes it works”. You shouldn’t stress over it or feel guilty. In the end, it’s just business and everyone wants to spend as little as they have to.

Glen Ferguson

Phone: 301-732-5165

Email: [email protected]

Website: https://www.coworkfrederick.com

Address: 122 E Patrick St, Frederick, MD 21701

If you want to show a little flexibility, consider the other freelancer adage: never lower your price, increase your value. You can offer some small amenity (coffee, free use of a projector, etc) so they feel like they’ve “won”.

You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

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On Wed, May 30, 2018 at 10:12 AM, Joanne Gerussi [email protected] wrote:

Thank you, Patrick. That’s how I feel too. As I am new to this, I was a bit lost on how I should respond to these requests. Now I know.

On Wednesday, 30 May 2018 15:22:54 UTC+2, Pat Manley wrote:

Don’t do it. Once you lower your prices, it’s impossible to raise them again. Determine your costs as best you can, research what others charge and stick with it. Events and meetings will not bring you future business, only more events at prices you can’t afford.

If any money you receive from events are over and above the revenue you based your business model on, then the first question you ask yourself is whether you want or need the events? Keep in mind that events can hurt your business if they are disruptive to your members, which they are in must cases.


Patrick W. Manley, RA, AIAA, ALA
Manley Architecture Group/MAG
3820 North High Street Columbus, Ohio 43214
[Ph: ](https://maps.google.com/?q=3820+North+High+Street+Columbus,+Ohio+43214+Ph:+    +(614&entry=gmail&source=g)(614) 545-1147
Cell: (614) 496-9096
Association of Licensed Architects (ALA)
www.manleyarchitects.us
Past President, Ohio Chapter of the Association of Licensed Architects and ALA National Board of Directors

On May 30, 2018, at 8:01 AM, Joanne Gerussi [email protected] wrote:

Hi everyone,

My name is Joanne and I am a new owner of a women coworking space in Switzerland. I just opened my space on Monday - 28th May. As I have gotten a space which is spacious and full of charms, I have several requests from people asking to rent the space to host workshops and events. The problem is, people are always asking for discounts or gracious pricing. Their reasoning is that my space is really new and they would be doing me a favour by bring people to my space and in return I should be charging at a really low price or free.

I am hesitant on this idea of extreme discount as at the end of the day, I still have bills to pay.

What is your advice on this?

Thank you in advance!

Joanne

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“never lower your price, increase your value”

This is the best advice.

Joanne, you’ve got a burn rate now, so you want to get butts in seats. It’s a little like going grocery shopping hungry.

In terms of getting the word out, the most impactful things you can do now are a little bit counterintuitive now that you have the space. Try getting very specific about who is going to be in your community. Unlike many other business offerings - including many kinds of traditional real estate - the customers of a coworking space will have direct impact each other…and in many cases, the other members will be the most valuable thing that they “get” with their membership.

Compare that to almost anything else you pay for…where you may be aware of the other customers, but it’s unlikely that you gain anything from them.

The best options are people you relate closest to, either professionally or culturally (e.g. people from a similar profession that you have experience in, or people from a hyperlocal region that you feel a sense of connection to).

Look for clusters of them that might already be gathering, and get to know them. Learn their interests, their goals, and their challenges.

Then look for ways to add value besides offering your space. The exact value you can provide depends heavily on their interests, goals, and challenges. But the sooner you have a sense of who your community is going to be, the easier everything else gets!

-Alex

···

On Wed, May 30, 2018 at 10:12 AM, Joanne Gerussi [email protected] wrote:

Thank you, Patrick. That’s how I feel too. As I am new to this, I was a bit lost on how I should respond to these requests. Now I know.

On Wednesday, 30 May 2018 15:22:54 UTC+2, Pat Manley wrote:

Don’t do it. Once you lower your prices, it’s impossible to raise them again. Determine your costs as best you can, research what others charge and stick with it. Events and meetings will not bring you future business, only more events at prices you can’t afford.

If any money you receive from events are over and above the revenue you based your business model on, then the first question you ask yourself is whether you want or need the events? Keep in mind that events can hurt your business if they are disruptive to your members, which they are in must cases.


Patrick W. Manley, RA, AIAA, ALA
Manley Architecture Group/MAG
3820 North High Street Columbus, Ohio 43214
[Ph: ](https://maps.google.com/?q=3820+North+High+Street+Columbus,+Ohio+43214+Ph:+    +(614&entry=gmail&source=g)(614) 545-1147
Cell: (614) 496-9096
Association of Licensed Architects (ALA)
www.manleyarchitects.us
Past President, Ohio Chapter of the Association of Licensed Architects and ALA National Board of Directors

On May 30, 2018, at 8:01 AM, Joanne Gerussi [email protected] wrote:

Hi everyone,

My name is Joanne and I am a new owner of a women coworking space in Switzerland. I just opened my space on Monday - 28th May. As I have gotten a space which is spacious and full of charms, I have several requests from people asking to rent the space to host workshops and events. The problem is, people are always asking for discounts or gracious pricing. Their reasoning is that my space is really new and they would be doing me a favour by bring people to my space and in return I should be charging at a really low price or free.

I am hesitant on this idea of extreme discount as at the end of the day, I still have bills to pay.

What is your advice on this?

Thank you in advance!

Joanne

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To provide a little of a retail, financial perspective.

- First, we typically only host events during evenings and weekends.
- So, we have discounted, but only after understanding our labor and other costs. You have to pay for our additional op ex to staff the late hours.

- We also know we earn a good 20% of our gross revenue from hourly and daily business (consistently for 10 years now). Some may only earn 1-5% so you’d be right that discounting may not be worth it.

- I do seek out recurring events, to both reduce cost of sales, but also encourage appropriate events to contribute to the community, as we all know, it takes a couple of times for members and others to participate. So they contractually agree to multiple events in exchange for the discount. Win win for me.

Just know your goals and reasons and the decision will be clearer.

JEROME CHANG

talk to us: (323) 330-9505

chat w/ us: http://www.BLANKSPACES.com/chat

WEST: Santa Monica | 1450 2nd St (@Broadway)

CENTRAL: Culver City | 9415 Culver Blvd (@Main St)

EAST: Downtown LA | 529 S Broadway (@Pershing Sq)

NORTH: Pasadena | 680 E. Colorado, Ste 180 (b/w Lake and Los Robles)

SOUTH: Long Beach | 309 Pine Ave (@Broadway) - opening Summer 2018

···

On Wed, May 30, 2018 at 10:12 AM, Joanne Gerussi [email protected] wrote:

Thank you, Patrick. That’s how I feel too. As I am new to this, I was a bit lost on how I should respond to these requests. Now I know.

On Wednesday, 30 May 2018 15:22:54 UTC+2, Pat Manley wrote:

Don’t do it. Once you lower your prices, it’s impossible to raise them again. Determine your costs as best you can, research what others charge and stick with it. Events and meetings will not bring you future business, only more events at prices you can’t afford.

If any money you receive from events are over and above the revenue you based your business model on, then the first question you ask yourself is whether you want or need the events? Keep in mind that events can hurt your business if they are disruptive to your members, which they are in must cases.


Patrick W. Manley, RA, AIAA, ALA
Manley Architecture Group/MAG
3820 North High Street Columbus, Ohio 43214
[Ph: ](https://maps.google.com/?q=3820+North+High+Street+Columbus,+Ohio+43214+Ph:+    +(614&entry=gmail&source=g)(614) 545-1147
Cell: (614) 496-9096
Association of Licensed Architects (ALA)
www.manleyarchitects.us
Past President, Ohio Chapter of the Association of Licensed Architects and ALA National Board of Directors

On May 30, 2018, at 8:01 AM, Joanne Gerussi [email protected] wrote:

Hi everyone,

My name is Joanne and I am a new owner of a women coworking space in Switzerland. I just opened my space on Monday - 28th May. As I have gotten a space which is spacious and full of charms, I have several requests from people asking to rent the space to host workshops and events. The problem is, people are always asking for discounts or gracious pricing. Their reasoning is that my space is really new and they would be doing me a favour by bring people to my space and in return I should be charging at a really low price or free.

I am hesitant on this idea of extreme discount as at the end of the day, I still have bills to pay.

What is your advice on this?

Thank you in advance!

Joanne

You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups “Coworking” group.

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“I do seek out recurring events, to both reduce cost of sales, but also encourage appropriate events to contribute to the community, as we all know, it takes a couple of times for members and others to participate. So they contractually agree to multiple events in exchange for the discount. Win win for me.”

We did something similar, structuring this as an “meetup membership” to encourage select event organizers to be their own primary point of contact between their group and our membership. And adding a big +1 to the financial benefits of turning it into recurring revenue, as well as the multiple instances before groups start to mingle.

In terms of presenting this as “more value” to the prospective meetup we learned that while there’s almost always a free space they could use, those free spaces are also in demand and it’s only a matter of time before the guest “loses their home” to another group or a financial incentive. By framing the organizational membership as “a way to be sure that you won’t lose your home” it’s been much easier to bring mature meetups on board, who then pass the cost along to a sponsor or a crowdfunded pool amongst their own members.

···

On Wed, May 30, 2018 at 10:12 AM, Joanne Gerussi [email protected] wrote:

Thank you, Patrick. That’s how I feel too. As I am new to this, I was a bit lost on how I should respond to these requests. Now I know.

On Wednesday, 30 May 2018 15:22:54 UTC+2, Pat Manley wrote:

Don’t do it. Once you lower your prices, it’s impossible to raise them again. Determine your costs as best you can, research what others charge and stick with it. Events and meetings will not bring you future business, only more events at prices you can’t afford.

If any money you receive from events are over and above the revenue you based your business model on, then the first question you ask yourself is whether you want or need the events? Keep in mind that events can hurt your business if they are disruptive to your members, which they are in must cases.


Patrick W. Manley, RA, AIAA, ALA
Manley Architecture Group/MAG
3820 North High Street Columbus, Ohio 43214
[Ph: ](https://maps.google.com/?q=3820+North+High+Street+Columbus,+Ohio+43214+Ph:+    +(614&entry=gmail&source=g)(614) 545-1147
Cell: (614) 496-9096
Association of Licensed Architects (ALA)
www.manleyarchitects.us
Past President, Ohio Chapter of the Association of Licensed Architects and ALA National Board of Directors

On May 30, 2018, at 8:01 AM, Joanne Gerussi [email protected] wrote:

Hi everyone,

My name is Joanne and I am a new owner of a women coworking space in Switzerland. I just opened my space on Monday - 28th May. As I have gotten a space which is spacious and full of charms, I have several requests from people asking to rent the space to host workshops and events. The problem is, people are always asking for discounts or gracious pricing. Their reasoning is that my space is really new and they would be doing me a favour by bring people to my space and in return I should be charging at a really low price or free.

I am hesitant on this idea of extreme discount as at the end of the day, I still have bills to pay.

What is your advice on this?

Thank you in advance!

Joanne

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